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Intravenous amantadine improves levadopa-induced dyskinesias: an acute double-blind placebo-controlled study.
Mov Disord. 2001 May; 16(3):515-20.MD

Abstract

Experimental evidence suggests that glutamatergic receptor blockade may improve the motor response complications associated with long-term levodopa treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Our objective was to evaluate the acute effect of amantadine, a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, on levodopa-induced dyskinesias, and to gain further insights into the antidyskinetic mechanism of this drug. Nine PD patients with motor fluctuations and severely disabling peak of dose dyskinesias received their first morning levodopa dose, followed by a 2-hour intravenous amantadine (200 mg) or placebo infusion, on two different days. Parkinsonian symptoms and dyskinesias were assessed every 15 minutes during the infusion and for 3 hours thereafter, while patients were taking their usual oral antiparkinsonian therapy, by means of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, motor examination), tapping test, and a modified Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). Intravenous amantadine acutely improved levodopa-induced dyskinesias by 50%without any loss of the anti-parkinsonian benefit from levodopa. This study confirms the antidyskinetic effect of amantadine and strengthens the rationale for using antiglutamatergic drugs in the treatment of parkinsonian motor fluctuations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience, Neurology Section, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100 Pisa, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11391748

Citation

Del Dotto, P, et al. "Intravenous Amantadine Improves Levadopa-induced Dyskinesias: an Acute Double-blind Placebo-controlled Study." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 16, no. 3, 2001, pp. 515-20.
Del Dotto P, Pavese N, Gambaccini G, et al. Intravenous amantadine improves levadopa-induced dyskinesias: an acute double-blind placebo-controlled study. Mov Disord. 2001;16(3):515-20.
Del Dotto, P., Pavese, N., Gambaccini, G., Bernardini, S., Metman, L. V., Chase, T. N., & Bonuccelli, U. (2001). Intravenous amantadine improves levadopa-induced dyskinesias: an acute double-blind placebo-controlled study. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 16(3), 515-20.
Del Dotto P, et al. Intravenous Amantadine Improves Levadopa-induced Dyskinesias: an Acute Double-blind Placebo-controlled Study. Mov Disord. 2001;16(3):515-20. PubMed PMID: 11391748.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intravenous amantadine improves levadopa-induced dyskinesias: an acute double-blind placebo-controlled study. AU - Del Dotto,P, AU - Pavese,N, AU - Gambaccini,G, AU - Bernardini,S, AU - Metman,L V, AU - Chase,T N, AU - Bonuccelli,U, PY - 2001/6/8/pubmed PY - 2001/8/17/medline PY - 2001/6/8/entrez SP - 515 EP - 20 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov Disord VL - 16 IS - 3 N2 - Experimental evidence suggests that glutamatergic receptor blockade may improve the motor response complications associated with long-term levodopa treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Our objective was to evaluate the acute effect of amantadine, a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, on levodopa-induced dyskinesias, and to gain further insights into the antidyskinetic mechanism of this drug. Nine PD patients with motor fluctuations and severely disabling peak of dose dyskinesias received their first morning levodopa dose, followed by a 2-hour intravenous amantadine (200 mg) or placebo infusion, on two different days. Parkinsonian symptoms and dyskinesias were assessed every 15 minutes during the infusion and for 3 hours thereafter, while patients were taking their usual oral antiparkinsonian therapy, by means of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, motor examination), tapping test, and a modified Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). Intravenous amantadine acutely improved levodopa-induced dyskinesias by 50%without any loss of the anti-parkinsonian benefit from levodopa. This study confirms the antidyskinetic effect of amantadine and strengthens the rationale for using antiglutamatergic drugs in the treatment of parkinsonian motor fluctuations. SN - 0885-3185 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11391748/Intravenous_amantadine_improves_levadopa_induced_dyskinesias:_an_acute_double_blind_placebo_controlled_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.1112 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -