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The origins and ends of giftedness.
Am Psychol. 2000 Jan; 55(1):159-69.AP

Abstract

Five issues about giftedness are discussed. First, the origins of giftedness are explored. The view that giftedness is entirely a product of training is critiqued. There is indirect evidence for atypical brain organization and innate talent in gifted children: Many gifted children and savants have enhanced right-hemisphere development, language-related difficulties, and autoimmune disorders. Second, the intense motivation of gifted children is discussed. Third, it is argued that gifted children have social and emotional difficulties that set them apart. Fourth, evidence for the often uneven cognitive profiles of such children is presented. Finally, the relationship between childhood giftedness and "domain" creativity in adulthood is discussed. Few gifted children go on to become adult creators because the skills and personality factors required to be a creator are very different from those typical of even the most highly gifted children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Boston College and Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11392860

Citation

Winner, E. "The Origins and Ends of Giftedness." The American Psychologist, vol. 55, no. 1, 2000, pp. 159-69.
Winner E. The origins and ends of giftedness. Am Psychol. 2000;55(1):159-69.
Winner, E. (2000). The origins and ends of giftedness. The American Psychologist, 55(1), 159-69.
Winner E. The Origins and Ends of Giftedness. Am Psychol. 2000;55(1):159-69. PubMed PMID: 11392860.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The origins and ends of giftedness. A1 - Winner,E, PY - 2001/6/8/pubmed PY - 2001/7/6/medline PY - 2001/6/8/entrez SP - 159 EP - 69 JF - The American psychologist JO - Am Psychol VL - 55 IS - 1 N2 - Five issues about giftedness are discussed. First, the origins of giftedness are explored. The view that giftedness is entirely a product of training is critiqued. There is indirect evidence for atypical brain organization and innate talent in gifted children: Many gifted children and savants have enhanced right-hemisphere development, language-related difficulties, and autoimmune disorders. Second, the intense motivation of gifted children is discussed. Third, it is argued that gifted children have social and emotional difficulties that set them apart. Fourth, evidence for the often uneven cognitive profiles of such children is presented. Finally, the relationship between childhood giftedness and "domain" creativity in adulthood is discussed. Few gifted children go on to become adult creators because the skills and personality factors required to be a creator are very different from those typical of even the most highly gifted children. SN - 0003-066X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11392860/The_origins_and_ends_of_giftedness_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/amp/55/1/159 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -