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Prospective study of zinc intake and the risk of age-related macular degeneration.
Ann Epidemiol 2001; 11(5):328-36AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Zinc is found in high concentrations in the retina and is hypothesized to reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Any long-term benefit associated with dietary zinc intake has not been evaluated.

METHODS

We followed 66,572 women and 37,636 men who were > or = 50 years old and had no diagnosis of AMD or cancer. Zinc intake from food, multivitamins, and supplements was assessed with a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire at baseline (in 1984 for women and in 1986 for men) and repeated during follow-up (twice for women, once for men).

RESULTS

During 10 years of follow-up for women and 8 years of follow-up for men, we confirmed 384 incident cases of AMD (195 cases of the early form and 189 cases of the late form) associated with a visual acuity loss of 20/30 or worse. After multivariate adjustment for potential risk factors, the pooled relative risk was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 1.57; p-value, test for trend, 0.74) among participants in the highest quintile of total zinc intake (energy-adjusted median; 25.5 mg/day for women and 40.1 mg/day for men) compared with those in the lowest quintile (energy-adjusted median; 8.5 mg/day for women and 9.9 mg/day for men). The relative risk for highest compared with lowest quintile was 1.04 (95% CI, 0.59 to 1.83; p-value, test for trend, 0.54) for zinc intake from food. Subjects who took zinc supplements had a pooled multivariate relative risk of 1.04 (95% CI, 0.75 to 1.45).

CONCLUSIONS

In these two large prospective studies, moderate zinc intake, either in food or in supplements, was not associated with a reduced risk of AMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. eunyoung.cho@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11399447

Citation

Cho, E, et al. "Prospective Study of Zinc Intake and the Risk of Age-related Macular Degeneration." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 11, no. 5, 2001, pp. 328-36.
Cho E, Stampfer MJ, Seddon JM, et al. Prospective study of zinc intake and the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Ann Epidemiol. 2001;11(5):328-36.
Cho, E., Stampfer, M. J., Seddon, J. M., Hung, S., Spiegelman, D., Rimm, E. B., ... Hankinson, S. E. (2001). Prospective study of zinc intake and the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Annals of Epidemiology, 11(5), pp. 328-36.
Cho E, et al. Prospective Study of Zinc Intake and the Risk of Age-related Macular Degeneration. Ann Epidemiol. 2001;11(5):328-36. PubMed PMID: 11399447.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of zinc intake and the risk of age-related macular degeneration. AU - Cho,E, AU - Stampfer,M J, AU - Seddon,J M, AU - Hung,S, AU - Spiegelman,D, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Hankinson,S E, PY - 2001/6/12/pubmed PY - 2001/8/10/medline PY - 2001/6/12/entrez SP - 328 EP - 36 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 11 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: Zinc is found in high concentrations in the retina and is hypothesized to reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Any long-term benefit associated with dietary zinc intake has not been evaluated. METHODS: We followed 66,572 women and 37,636 men who were > or = 50 years old and had no diagnosis of AMD or cancer. Zinc intake from food, multivitamins, and supplements was assessed with a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire at baseline (in 1984 for women and in 1986 for men) and repeated during follow-up (twice for women, once for men). RESULTS: During 10 years of follow-up for women and 8 years of follow-up for men, we confirmed 384 incident cases of AMD (195 cases of the early form and 189 cases of the late form) associated with a visual acuity loss of 20/30 or worse. After multivariate adjustment for potential risk factors, the pooled relative risk was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 1.57; p-value, test for trend, 0.74) among participants in the highest quintile of total zinc intake (energy-adjusted median; 25.5 mg/day for women and 40.1 mg/day for men) compared with those in the lowest quintile (energy-adjusted median; 8.5 mg/day for women and 9.9 mg/day for men). The relative risk for highest compared with lowest quintile was 1.04 (95% CI, 0.59 to 1.83; p-value, test for trend, 0.54) for zinc intake from food. Subjects who took zinc supplements had a pooled multivariate relative risk of 1.04 (95% CI, 0.75 to 1.45). CONCLUSIONS: In these two large prospective studies, moderate zinc intake, either in food or in supplements, was not associated with a reduced risk of AMD. SN - 1047-2797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11399447/Prospective_study_of_zinc_intake_and_the_risk_of_age_related_macular_degeneration_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(01)00217-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -