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Are coffee, tea, and total fluid consumption associated with bladder cancer risk? Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study.
Cancer Causes Control 2001; 12(3):231-8CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Coffee, tea, and fluid consumption have been thought to influence bladder cancer incidence. In a large prospective study, these associations were investigated.

METHODS

In 1986, cohort members (55-69 years) completed a questionnaire on cancer risk factors. Follow-up was established by linkage to cancer registries until 1992. The multivariable case-cohort analysis was based on 569 bladder cancer cases and 3,123 subcohort members.

RESULTS

The incidence rate ratios (RR) for men consuming <2 cups of coffee/day was 0.89 (95% CI 0.51-1.5) using the median consumption category (4-<5 cups/day) as reference. This RR increased to 1.3 (95% CI 0.94-1.9) for men consuming >7 cups/day, although no clear dose response association was found. The RRs decreased from 1.2 (95% CI 0.56-2.7) for women consuming <2 cups of coffee/day to 0.36 (95% CI 0.18-0.72) for women consuming >5 cups/day compared to the median consumption category (3-<4 cups/day). Men and women who abstained from drinking tea had a RR of 1.3 (95% Cl 0.97-1.8) compared to those consuming 2-<3 cups of tea per day (median consumption category). The RR for men and women comparing highest to lowest quintile of total fluid consumption was 0.87 (95% CI 0.63 1.2).

CONCLUSION

The data suggest a possible positive association between coffee consumption and bladder cancer risk in men and a probable inverse association in women. Tea consumption was inversely associated with bladder cancer. Total fluid consumption did not appear to be associated with bladder cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. mpa.zeegers@epid.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11405328

Citation

Zeegers, M P., et al. "Are Coffee, Tea, and Total Fluid Consumption Associated With Bladder Cancer Risk? Results From the Netherlands Cohort Study." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 12, no. 3, 2001, pp. 231-8.
Zeegers MP, Dorant E, Goldbohm RA, et al. Are coffee, tea, and total fluid consumption associated with bladder cancer risk? Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2001;12(3):231-8.
Zeegers, M. P., Dorant, E., Goldbohm, R. A., & van den Brandt, P. A. (2001). Are coffee, tea, and total fluid consumption associated with bladder cancer risk? Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 12(3), pp. 231-8.
Zeegers MP, et al. Are Coffee, Tea, and Total Fluid Consumption Associated With Bladder Cancer Risk? Results From the Netherlands Cohort Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2001;12(3):231-8. PubMed PMID: 11405328.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are coffee, tea, and total fluid consumption associated with bladder cancer risk? Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study. AU - Zeegers,M P, AU - Dorant,E, AU - Goldbohm,R A, AU - van den Brandt,P A, PY - 2001/6/19/pubmed PY - 2001/11/3/medline PY - 2001/6/19/entrez SP - 231 EP - 8 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 12 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Coffee, tea, and fluid consumption have been thought to influence bladder cancer incidence. In a large prospective study, these associations were investigated. METHODS: In 1986, cohort members (55-69 years) completed a questionnaire on cancer risk factors. Follow-up was established by linkage to cancer registries until 1992. The multivariable case-cohort analysis was based on 569 bladder cancer cases and 3,123 subcohort members. RESULTS: The incidence rate ratios (RR) for men consuming <2 cups of coffee/day was 0.89 (95% CI 0.51-1.5) using the median consumption category (4-<5 cups/day) as reference. This RR increased to 1.3 (95% CI 0.94-1.9) for men consuming >7 cups/day, although no clear dose response association was found. The RRs decreased from 1.2 (95% CI 0.56-2.7) for women consuming <2 cups of coffee/day to 0.36 (95% CI 0.18-0.72) for women consuming >5 cups/day compared to the median consumption category (3-<4 cups/day). Men and women who abstained from drinking tea had a RR of 1.3 (95% Cl 0.97-1.8) compared to those consuming 2-<3 cups of tea per day (median consumption category). The RR for men and women comparing highest to lowest quintile of total fluid consumption was 0.87 (95% CI 0.63 1.2). CONCLUSION: The data suggest a possible positive association between coffee consumption and bladder cancer risk in men and a probable inverse association in women. Tea consumption was inversely associated with bladder cancer. Total fluid consumption did not appear to be associated with bladder cancer. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11405328/Are_coffee_tea_and_total_fluid_consumption_associated_with_bladder_cancer_risk_Results_from_the_Netherlands_Cohort_Study_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=11405328.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -