Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Facial paresis in children; consider Lyme disease].
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2001 May 26; 145(21):1013-6.NT

Abstract

Three girls, aged 3, 7 and 13 years, developed acute peripheral facial palsy. The first patient was initially diagnosed as having Bell's palsy. The third patient had negative serology at first assessment, on the basis of which the diagnosis of Lyme disease was temporarily rejected. Ultimately, all three appeared to have neuroborreliosis. They were treated with intravenous ceftriaxone and recovered well. Facial palsy in childhood is frequently caused by Lyme borreliosis and infection with Borrelia burgdorferi should therefore be investigated, even if there are no signs of a tick bite or erythema migrans. Diagnosis is made by serology, followed by immunoblotting to confirm a positive result. In case of strong suspicion based on the patient's history or physical examination or a positive serology, lumbar puncture should be carried out. Antibiotic treatment facilitates recovery and prevents complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, afd. Kindergeneeskunde, Leiden.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

dut

PubMed ID

11407277

Citation

Dorresteijn, E M., and J M. Kouwenberg. "[Facial Paresis in Children; Consider Lyme Disease]." Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde, vol. 145, no. 21, 2001, pp. 1013-6.
Dorresteijn EM, Kouwenberg JM. [Facial paresis in children; consider Lyme disease]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2001;145(21):1013-6.
Dorresteijn, E. M., & Kouwenberg, J. M. (2001). [Facial paresis in children; consider Lyme disease]. Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde, 145(21), 1013-6.
Dorresteijn EM, Kouwenberg JM. [Facial Paresis in Children; Consider Lyme Disease]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2001 May 26;145(21):1013-6. PubMed PMID: 11407277.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Facial paresis in children; consider Lyme disease]. AU - Dorresteijn,E M, AU - Kouwenberg,J M, PY - 2001/6/16/pubmed PY - 2001/7/20/medline PY - 2001/6/16/entrez SP - 1013 EP - 6 JF - Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde JO - Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd VL - 145 IS - 21 N2 - Three girls, aged 3, 7 and 13 years, developed acute peripheral facial palsy. The first patient was initially diagnosed as having Bell's palsy. The third patient had negative serology at first assessment, on the basis of which the diagnosis of Lyme disease was temporarily rejected. Ultimately, all three appeared to have neuroborreliosis. They were treated with intravenous ceftriaxone and recovered well. Facial palsy in childhood is frequently caused by Lyme borreliosis and infection with Borrelia burgdorferi should therefore be investigated, even if there are no signs of a tick bite or erythema migrans. Diagnosis is made by serology, followed by immunoblotting to confirm a positive result. In case of strong suspicion based on the patient's history or physical examination or a positive serology, lumbar puncture should be carried out. Antibiotic treatment facilitates recovery and prevents complications. SN - 0028-2162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11407277/[Facial_paresis_in_children L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9677 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -