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Art macabre: resurrectionists and anatomists.
ANZ J Surg. 2001 Jun; 71(6):377-80.AJ

Abstract

The teaching of anatomy in England and Scotland from the 16th to the 19th centuries was carried out by the Companies of Barber Surgeons and also there were a number of private schools. The only sources of material for dissection and study were the gallows or the grave and the supply from the former was limited by law. Therefore the latter became the source of a saleable commodity, and so the profession of grave robbing became established. The taking of bodies was abhorrent to the populace, fights and riots would sometimes occur and public outrage was directed towards anatomists. The passing of the Anatomy Act of 1832 helped bring an end to the grisly business of snatching bodies, but the supply of material for study still remained a problem. In the 1920s there was a change in public attitude toward dissection which resulted in an increase in the donation of bodies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

reginaldm@bigpond.com

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11409024

Citation

Magee, R. "Art Macabre: Resurrectionists and Anatomists." ANZ Journal of Surgery, vol. 71, no. 6, 2001, pp. 377-80.
Magee R. Art macabre: resurrectionists and anatomists. ANZ J Surg. 2001;71(6):377-80.
Magee, R. (2001). Art macabre: resurrectionists and anatomists. ANZ Journal of Surgery, 71(6), 377-80.
Magee R. Art Macabre: Resurrectionists and Anatomists. ANZ J Surg. 2001;71(6):377-80. PubMed PMID: 11409024.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Art macabre: resurrectionists and anatomists. A1 - Magee,R, PY - 2001/6/21/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/6/21/entrez SP - 377 EP - 80 JF - ANZ journal of surgery JO - ANZ J Surg VL - 71 IS - 6 N2 - The teaching of anatomy in England and Scotland from the 16th to the 19th centuries was carried out by the Companies of Barber Surgeons and also there were a number of private schools. The only sources of material for dissection and study were the gallows or the grave and the supply from the former was limited by law. Therefore the latter became the source of a saleable commodity, and so the profession of grave robbing became established. The taking of bodies was abhorrent to the populace, fights and riots would sometimes occur and public outrage was directed towards anatomists. The passing of the Anatomy Act of 1832 helped bring an end to the grisly business of snatching bodies, but the supply of material for study still remained a problem. In the 1920s there was a change in public attitude toward dissection which resulted in an increase in the donation of bodies. SN - 1445-1433 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11409024/Art_macabre:_resurrectionists_and_anatomists_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1445-1433&date=2001&volume=71&issue=6&spage=377 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -