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The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on risk for coronary heart disease.
Ann Intern Med 2001; 134(12):1106-14AIM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many constituents of fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk for coronary heart disease, but data on the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk for coronary heart disease are sparse.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with risk for coronary heart disease.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

The Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study.

PARTICIPANTS

84 251 women 34 to 59 years of age who were followed for 14 years and 42 148 men 40 to 75 years who were followed for 8 years. All were free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes at baseline.

MEASUREMENTS

The main outcome measure was incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction or fatal coronary heart disease (1127 cases in women and 1063 cases in men). Diet was assessed by using food-frequency questionnaires.

RESULTS

After adjustment for standard cardiovascular risk factors, persons in the highest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake had a relative risk for coronary heart disease of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.93) compared with those in the lowest quintile of intake. Each 1-serving/d increase in intake of fruits or vegetables was associated with a 4% lower risk for coronary heart disease (relative risk, 0.96 [CI, 0.94 to 0.99]; P = 0.01, test for trend). Green leafy vegetables (relative risk with 1-serving/d increase, 0.77 [CI, 0.64 to 0.93]), and vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables (relative risk with 1-serving/d increase, 0.94 [CI, 0.88 to 0.99]) contributed most to the apparent protective effect of total fruit and vegetable intake.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of fruits and vegetables, particularly green leafy vegetables and vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables, appears to have a protective effect against coronary heart disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11412050

Citation

Joshipura, K J., et al. "The Effect of Fruit and Vegetable Intake On Risk for Coronary Heart Disease." Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 134, no. 12, 2001, pp. 1106-14.
Joshipura KJ, Hu FB, Manson JE, et al. The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on risk for coronary heart disease. Ann Intern Med. 2001;134(12):1106-14.
Joshipura, K. J., Hu, F. B., Manson, J. E., Stampfer, M. J., Rimm, E. B., Speizer, F. E., ... Willett, W. C. (2001). The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on risk for coronary heart disease. Annals of Internal Medicine, 134(12), pp. 1106-14.
Joshipura KJ, et al. The Effect of Fruit and Vegetable Intake On Risk for Coronary Heart Disease. Ann Intern Med. 2001 Jun 19;134(12):1106-14. PubMed PMID: 11412050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on risk for coronary heart disease. AU - Joshipura,K J, AU - Hu,F B, AU - Manson,J E, AU - Stampfer,M J, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Speizer,F E, AU - Colditz,G, AU - Ascherio,A, AU - Rosner,B, AU - Spiegelman,D, AU - Willett,W C, PY - 2001/6/20/pubmed PY - 2001/6/29/medline PY - 2001/6/20/entrez SP - 1106 EP - 14 JF - Annals of internal medicine JO - Ann. Intern. Med. VL - 134 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many constituents of fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk for coronary heart disease, but data on the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk for coronary heart disease are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with risk for coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: The Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study. PARTICIPANTS: 84 251 women 34 to 59 years of age who were followed for 14 years and 42 148 men 40 to 75 years who were followed for 8 years. All were free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes at baseline. MEASUREMENTS: The main outcome measure was incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction or fatal coronary heart disease (1127 cases in women and 1063 cases in men). Diet was assessed by using food-frequency questionnaires. RESULTS: After adjustment for standard cardiovascular risk factors, persons in the highest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake had a relative risk for coronary heart disease of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.93) compared with those in the lowest quintile of intake. Each 1-serving/d increase in intake of fruits or vegetables was associated with a 4% lower risk for coronary heart disease (relative risk, 0.96 [CI, 0.94 to 0.99]; P = 0.01, test for trend). Green leafy vegetables (relative risk with 1-serving/d increase, 0.77 [CI, 0.64 to 0.93]), and vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables (relative risk with 1-serving/d increase, 0.94 [CI, 0.88 to 0.99]) contributed most to the apparent protective effect of total fruit and vegetable intake. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of fruits and vegetables, particularly green leafy vegetables and vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables, appears to have a protective effect against coronary heart disease. SN - 0003-4819 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11412050/The_effect_of_fruit_and_vegetable_intake_on_risk_for_coronary_heart_disease_ L2 - https://www.annals.org/article.aspx?volume=134&issue=12&page=1106 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -