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Patient satisfaction after biofeedback for constipation and pelvic floor dyssynergia.
Swiss Med Wkly. 2001 Mar 24; 131(11-12):152-6.SM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients referred for chronic constipation frequently report symptoms of straining, feeling of incomplete evacuation, or the need to facilitate defecation digitally (dyschezia). When such patients show manometric evidence of inappropriate contraction or failure to relax the pelvic floor muscles during attempts to defecate, they are diagnosed as having pelvic floor dyssynergia (Rome I).

AIMS

To evaluate long-term satisfaction of patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia after biofeedback.

PATIENTS

Forty-one consecutive patients referred for chronic constipation at an outpatient gastrointestinal unit and diagnosed as having pelvic floor dyssynergia who completed a full course of biofeedback.

METHODS

Data have been collected using a standardised questionnaire. A questionnaire survey of patients' satisfaction rate and requirement of aperients was undertaken.

RESULTS

Mean age and symptom duration were respectively 41 and 20 years. Half of patients reported fewer than 3 bowel motions per week. Patients were treated with a mean of 5 biofeedback sessions. At the end of the therapy pelvic floor dyssynergia was alleviated in 85% of patients and 49% were able to stop all aperients. Satisfaction was maintained at follow-up telephone interviews undertaken after a mean period of 2 years, as biofeedback was helpful for 79% of patients and 47% still abstained from intake of aperients.

CONCLUSIONS

Satisfaction after biofeedback is high for patients referred for chronic constipation and diagnosed with pelvic floor dyssynergia. Biofeedback improves symptoms related to dyschezia and reduces use of aperients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, CHUV/PMU, Lausanne, Switerland. Paul.Wiesel@hospvd.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11416888

Citation

Wiesel, P H., et al. "Patient Satisfaction After Biofeedback for Constipation and Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia." Swiss Medical Weekly, vol. 131, no. 11-12, 2001, pp. 152-6.
Wiesel PH, Dorta G, Cuypers P, et al. Patient satisfaction after biofeedback for constipation and pelvic floor dyssynergia. Swiss Med Wkly. 2001;131(11-12):152-6.
Wiesel, P. H., Dorta, G., Cuypers, P., Herranz, M., Kreis, M. E., Schnegg, J. F., & Jornod, P. (2001). Patient satisfaction after biofeedback for constipation and pelvic floor dyssynergia. Swiss Medical Weekly, 131(11-12), 152-6.
Wiesel PH, et al. Patient Satisfaction After Biofeedback for Constipation and Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia. Swiss Med Wkly. 2001 Mar 24;131(11-12):152-6. PubMed PMID: 11416888.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patient satisfaction after biofeedback for constipation and pelvic floor dyssynergia. AU - Wiesel,P H, AU - Dorta,G, AU - Cuypers,P, AU - Herranz,M, AU - Kreis,M E, AU - Schnegg,J F, AU - Jornod,P, PY - 2001/6/22/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/6/22/entrez SP - 152 EP - 6 JF - Swiss medical weekly JO - Swiss Med Wkly VL - 131 IS - 11-12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients referred for chronic constipation frequently report symptoms of straining, feeling of incomplete evacuation, or the need to facilitate defecation digitally (dyschezia). When such patients show manometric evidence of inappropriate contraction or failure to relax the pelvic floor muscles during attempts to defecate, they are diagnosed as having pelvic floor dyssynergia (Rome I). AIMS: To evaluate long-term satisfaction of patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia after biofeedback. PATIENTS: Forty-one consecutive patients referred for chronic constipation at an outpatient gastrointestinal unit and diagnosed as having pelvic floor dyssynergia who completed a full course of biofeedback. METHODS: Data have been collected using a standardised questionnaire. A questionnaire survey of patients' satisfaction rate and requirement of aperients was undertaken. RESULTS: Mean age and symptom duration were respectively 41 and 20 years. Half of patients reported fewer than 3 bowel motions per week. Patients were treated with a mean of 5 biofeedback sessions. At the end of the therapy pelvic floor dyssynergia was alleviated in 85% of patients and 49% were able to stop all aperients. Satisfaction was maintained at follow-up telephone interviews undertaken after a mean period of 2 years, as biofeedback was helpful for 79% of patients and 47% still abstained from intake of aperients. CONCLUSIONS: Satisfaction after biofeedback is high for patients referred for chronic constipation and diagnosed with pelvic floor dyssynergia. Biofeedback improves symptoms related to dyschezia and reduces use of aperients. SN - 1424-7860 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11416888/Patient_satisfaction_after_biofeedback_for_constipation_and_pelvic_floor_dyssynergia_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/1885 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -