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Ultrasonographic detection and assessment of preclinical oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced colonic pathology.
Clin Infect Dis 2001; 33(2):166-70CI

Abstract

In northern Ghana and Togo, Oesophagostomum bifurcum infects an estimated 250,000 people, as determined by cultures of stool samples. The juvenile stages of the helminth develop within colonic wall nodules, causing Dapaong tumor or multinodular disease, at the rate of 1 case per week at Nalerigu Hospital in Ghana. Our aim was to discover whether suspected colonic-wall pathology is ultrasonographically visible in asymptomatic individuals living in the area where O. bifurcum is endemic. A total of 464 persons from 3 villages, ranging from highly infected to noninfected, were examined with ultrasonography. Anechogenic colonic lesions with posterior wall enhancement were observed in 71 (54.2%) of 131 and 57 (24.5%) of 233 persons from the villages of endemicity, and no lesions were seen in persons from the village outside the area of endemicity. We describe the lesions noted in this study as nodules caused by O. bifurcum, on the basis of their association at a population level with prevalence of larvae in stools, their expected ultrasonographic appearance and distribution (on the basis of our surgical experience with oesophagostomiasis), and the lack of a convincing differential diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, Leiden, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11418875

Citation

Storey, P A., et al. "Ultrasonographic Detection and Assessment of Preclinical Oesophagostomum Bifurcum-induced Colonic Pathology." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 33, no. 2, 2001, pp. 166-70.
Storey PA, Spannbrucker N, Yelifari L, et al. Ultrasonographic detection and assessment of preclinical oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced colonic pathology. Clin Infect Dis. 2001;33(2):166-70.
Storey, P. A., Spannbrucker, N., Yelifari, L., Dery, G., Magnussen, P., Doehring, E., & Polderman, A. M. (2001). Ultrasonographic detection and assessment of preclinical oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced colonic pathology. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 33(2), pp. 166-70.
Storey PA, et al. Ultrasonographic Detection and Assessment of Preclinical Oesophagostomum Bifurcum-induced Colonic Pathology. Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Jul 15;33(2):166-70. PubMed PMID: 11418875.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ultrasonographic detection and assessment of preclinical oesophagostomum bifurcum-induced colonic pathology. AU - Storey,P A, AU - Spannbrucker,N, AU - Yelifari,L, AU - Dery,G, AU - Magnussen,P, AU - Doehring,E, AU - Polderman,A M, Y1 - 2001/06/15/ PY - 2000/08/07/received PY - 2000/11/13/revised PY - 2001/6/22/pubmed PY - 2001/9/14/medline PY - 2001/6/22/entrez SP - 166 EP - 70 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 33 IS - 2 N2 - In northern Ghana and Togo, Oesophagostomum bifurcum infects an estimated 250,000 people, as determined by cultures of stool samples. The juvenile stages of the helminth develop within colonic wall nodules, causing Dapaong tumor or multinodular disease, at the rate of 1 case per week at Nalerigu Hospital in Ghana. Our aim was to discover whether suspected colonic-wall pathology is ultrasonographically visible in asymptomatic individuals living in the area where O. bifurcum is endemic. A total of 464 persons from 3 villages, ranging from highly infected to noninfected, were examined with ultrasonography. Anechogenic colonic lesions with posterior wall enhancement were observed in 71 (54.2%) of 131 and 57 (24.5%) of 233 persons from the villages of endemicity, and no lesions were seen in persons from the village outside the area of endemicity. We describe the lesions noted in this study as nodules caused by O. bifurcum, on the basis of their association at a population level with prevalence of larvae in stools, their expected ultrasonographic appearance and distribution (on the basis of our surgical experience with oesophagostomiasis), and the lack of a convincing differential diagnosis. SN - 1058-4838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11418875/Ultrasonographic_detection_and_assessment_of_preclinical_oesophagostomum_bifurcum-induced_colonic_pathology L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/321809 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -