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What drugs are our frail elderly patients taking? Do drugs they take or fail to take put them at increased risk of interactions and inappropriate medication use?
Can Fam Physician 2001; 47:1198-204CF

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether there were discrepancies between what medications frail elderly outpatients took and what physicians thought they took and whether discrepancies put patients at risk of taking inappropriate drugs and of increasing the potential for drug interactions.

DESIGN

Case series.

SETTING

Day Hospital Program at St Mary's of the Lake Hospital in Kingston, Ont.

PARTICIPANTS

One hundred twenty community-living elderly patients attending the Day Hospital Program in 1998. Three patients and two family physicians declined to participate.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Lists of medications being taken by patients compared with lists of medications in physicians' charts. Category according to explicit criteria that each drug fell into and risk of drug interactions as determined by the Clinidata Drug Interaction Program.

RESULTS

Of the 120 patients, 115 had at least one discrepancy between their lists of medications and their physicians' lists. Of the 1390 medications on the lists, 521 (37%) were being taken by patients without their doctors' knowledge, 82 (6%) were not being taken by patients when doctors thought they were, and 133 (10%) were on both patients' and their doctors' lists but with dosages or frequency of administration that were different. More potential drug interactions were identified on patients' lists than on physicians' lists. No increase in risk of inappropriate drug use was identified.

CONCLUSION

Family physicians are often unaware of all the medications their patients are actually taking. Medications used by patients without physicians' knowledge increase the likelihood of drug interactions. Family physicians should look at and inquire about all medications, including over-the-counter drugs, their patients are actually taking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11421047

Citation

Frank, C, et al. "What Drugs Are Our Frail Elderly Patients Taking? Do Drugs They Take or Fail to Take Put Them at Increased Risk of Interactions and Inappropriate Medication Use?" Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien, vol. 47, 2001, pp. 1198-204.
Frank C, Godwin M, Verma S, et al. What drugs are our frail elderly patients taking? Do drugs they take or fail to take put them at increased risk of interactions and inappropriate medication use? Can Fam Physician. 2001;47:1198-204.
Frank, C., Godwin, M., Verma, S., Kelly, A., Birenbaum, A., Seguin, R., & Anderson, J. (2001). What drugs are our frail elderly patients taking? Do drugs they take or fail to take put them at increased risk of interactions and inappropriate medication use? Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien, 47, pp. 1198-204.
Frank C, et al. What Drugs Are Our Frail Elderly Patients Taking? Do Drugs They Take or Fail to Take Put Them at Increased Risk of Interactions and Inappropriate Medication Use. Can Fam Physician. 2001;47:1198-204. PubMed PMID: 11421047.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What drugs are our frail elderly patients taking? Do drugs they take or fail to take put them at increased risk of interactions and inappropriate medication use? AU - Frank,C, AU - Godwin,M, AU - Verma,S, AU - Kelly,A, AU - Birenbaum,A, AU - Seguin,R, AU - Anderson,J, PY - 2001/6/26/pubmed PY - 2001/7/13/medline PY - 2001/6/26/entrez SP - 1198 EP - 204 JF - Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien JO - Can Fam Physician VL - 47 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there were discrepancies between what medications frail elderly outpatients took and what physicians thought they took and whether discrepancies put patients at risk of taking inappropriate drugs and of increasing the potential for drug interactions. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: Day Hospital Program at St Mary's of the Lake Hospital in Kingston, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twenty community-living elderly patients attending the Day Hospital Program in 1998. Three patients and two family physicians declined to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lists of medications being taken by patients compared with lists of medications in physicians' charts. Category according to explicit criteria that each drug fell into and risk of drug interactions as determined by the Clinidata Drug Interaction Program. RESULTS: Of the 120 patients, 115 had at least one discrepancy between their lists of medications and their physicians' lists. Of the 1390 medications on the lists, 521 (37%) were being taken by patients without their doctors' knowledge, 82 (6%) were not being taken by patients when doctors thought they were, and 133 (10%) were on both patients' and their doctors' lists but with dosages or frequency of administration that were different. More potential drug interactions were identified on patients' lists than on physicians' lists. No increase in risk of inappropriate drug use was identified. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often unaware of all the medications their patients are actually taking. Medications used by patients without physicians' knowledge increase the likelihood of drug interactions. Family physicians should look at and inquire about all medications, including over-the-counter drugs, their patients are actually taking. SN - 0008-350X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11421047/What_drugs_are_our_frail_elderly_patients_taking_Do_drugs_they_take_or_fail_to_take_put_them_at_increased_risk_of_interactions_and_inappropriate_medication_use L2 - http://www.cfp.ca/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11421047 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -