Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Polyunsaturated fatty acids in maternal diet, breast milk, and serum lipid fatty acids of infants in relation to atopy.
Allergy 2001; 56(7):633-8A

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The increased consumption of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has been shown to coincide with the increased prevalence of atopic diseases. We aimed to investigate whether maternal diet and atopic status influence the PUFA composition of breast milk and the serum lipid fatty acids of infants.

METHODS

Maternal diet was assessed by a food questionnaire. The PUFA composition of breast milk obtained at 3 months from 20 allergic and 20 healthy mothers and of their infants' (10 atopic and 10 nonatopic/group of mothers) serum lipids was analyzed.

RESULTS

Although no differences in maternal PUFA intake were observed, the breast milk of allergic mothers contained less gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 n-6) than that of healthy mothers. Similarly, atopic infants had less gamma-linolenic acid in phospholipids than healthy infants, although n-6 PUFA were elevated in other serum lipid fractions in atopic infants. The serum lipid fatty acids in atopic infants did not correlate with those in maternal breast milk.

CONCLUSION

Our results suggest that dietary n-6 PUFA are not as readily transferred into breast milk or incorporated into serum phospholipids, but may be utilized for other purposes, such as eicosanoid precursors, in allergic/atopic individuals. Subsequently, high dietary proportions of n-6 PUFA, or reduced proportions of regulatory PUFA, such as gamma-linolenic acid and n-3 PUFA, may be a risk factor for the development of atopic disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, and Pediatrics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11421921

Citation

Kankaanpää, P, et al. "Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Maternal Diet, Breast Milk, and Serum Lipid Fatty Acids of Infants in Relation to Atopy." Allergy, vol. 56, no. 7, 2001, pp. 633-8.
Kankaanpää P, Nurmela K, Erkkilä A, et al. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in maternal diet, breast milk, and serum lipid fatty acids of infants in relation to atopy. Allergy. 2001;56(7):633-8.
Kankaanpää, P., Nurmela, K., Erkkilä, A., Kalliomäki, M., Holmberg-Marttila, D., Salminen, S., & Isolauri, E. (2001). Polyunsaturated fatty acids in maternal diet, breast milk, and serum lipid fatty acids of infants in relation to atopy. Allergy, 56(7), pp. 633-8.
Kankaanpää P, et al. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Maternal Diet, Breast Milk, and Serum Lipid Fatty Acids of Infants in Relation to Atopy. Allergy. 2001;56(7):633-8. PubMed PMID: 11421921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Polyunsaturated fatty acids in maternal diet, breast milk, and serum lipid fatty acids of infants in relation to atopy. AU - Kankaanpää,P, AU - Nurmela,K, AU - Erkkilä,A, AU - Kalliomäki,M, AU - Holmberg-Marttila,D, AU - Salminen,S, AU - Isolauri,E, PY - 2001/6/26/pubmed PY - 2001/8/31/medline PY - 2001/6/26/entrez SP - 633 EP - 8 JF - Allergy JO - Allergy VL - 56 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The increased consumption of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has been shown to coincide with the increased prevalence of atopic diseases. We aimed to investigate whether maternal diet and atopic status influence the PUFA composition of breast milk and the serum lipid fatty acids of infants. METHODS: Maternal diet was assessed by a food questionnaire. The PUFA composition of breast milk obtained at 3 months from 20 allergic and 20 healthy mothers and of their infants' (10 atopic and 10 nonatopic/group of mothers) serum lipids was analyzed. RESULTS: Although no differences in maternal PUFA intake were observed, the breast milk of allergic mothers contained less gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 n-6) than that of healthy mothers. Similarly, atopic infants had less gamma-linolenic acid in phospholipids than healthy infants, although n-6 PUFA were elevated in other serum lipid fractions in atopic infants. The serum lipid fatty acids in atopic infants did not correlate with those in maternal breast milk. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that dietary n-6 PUFA are not as readily transferred into breast milk or incorporated into serum phospholipids, but may be utilized for other purposes, such as eicosanoid precursors, in allergic/atopic individuals. Subsequently, high dietary proportions of n-6 PUFA, or reduced proportions of regulatory PUFA, such as gamma-linolenic acid and n-3 PUFA, may be a risk factor for the development of atopic disease. SN - 0105-4538 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11421921/Polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_in_maternal_diet_breast_milk_and_serum_lipid_fatty_acids_of_infants_in_relation_to_atopy_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0105-4538&date=2001&volume=56&issue=7&spage=633 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -