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Impaired glucose metabolism predicts mortality after a myocardial infarction.
Int J Cardiol 2001; 79(2-3):207-14IJ

Abstract

Diabetes is a risk factor for increased mortality after a myocardial infarction. Whether this applies for patients with hyperglycemia during the acute phase of a acute myocardial infarction is unclear. Therefore we determined the relation between admission plasma glucose level and mortality in a prospectively collected series of 336 consecutive AMI patients. Patients were divided in four groups based on WHO criteria for glucose levels: I: <5.6 mmol/l, II: 5.6--8.3 mmol/l, III: 8.4--11.0 mmol/l, IV: 11.1 mmol/l. The average age was 68+/-11 years with a peak CK of 1378+/-160 U/l, 34% were anterior wall AMIs and 52% were treated with thrombolysis. All patients had a long-term follow-up control at an average of 14.2 months. One year mortality rate was 19.3% and rose to 44% in patients with glucose levels >11.1 mmol/l. The mortality was higher in diabetic patients than in non-diabetic patients (40 vs. 16%; P<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed an independent effect of glucose level on mortality. In conclusions, our study in an unselected patient population demonstrates that admission plasma glucose level independently predicts 1 year mortality even in absence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Further studies evaluating the effect of acute insulin intervention in reducing mortality are warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, Medisch Centrum Alkmaar, Postbus 501, 1800 AM Alkmaar, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11461743

Citation

Bolk, J, et al. "Impaired Glucose Metabolism Predicts Mortality After a Myocardial Infarction." International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 79, no. 2-3, 2001, pp. 207-14.
Bolk J, van der Ploeg T, Cornel JH, et al. Impaired glucose metabolism predicts mortality after a myocardial infarction. Int J Cardiol. 2001;79(2-3):207-14.
Bolk, J., van der Ploeg, T., Cornel, J. H., Arnold, A. E., Sepers, J., & Umans, V. A. (2001). Impaired glucose metabolism predicts mortality after a myocardial infarction. International Journal of Cardiology, 79(2-3), pp. 207-14.
Bolk J, et al. Impaired Glucose Metabolism Predicts Mortality After a Myocardial Infarction. Int J Cardiol. 2001;79(2-3):207-14. PubMed PMID: 11461743.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impaired glucose metabolism predicts mortality after a myocardial infarction. AU - Bolk,J, AU - van der Ploeg,T, AU - Cornel,J H, AU - Arnold,A E, AU - Sepers,J, AU - Umans,V A, PY - 2001/7/20/pubmed PY - 2001/9/28/medline PY - 2001/7/20/entrez SP - 207 EP - 14 JF - International journal of cardiology JO - Int. J. Cardiol. VL - 79 IS - 2-3 N2 - Diabetes is a risk factor for increased mortality after a myocardial infarction. Whether this applies for patients with hyperglycemia during the acute phase of a acute myocardial infarction is unclear. Therefore we determined the relation between admission plasma glucose level and mortality in a prospectively collected series of 336 consecutive AMI patients. Patients were divided in four groups based on WHO criteria for glucose levels: I: <5.6 mmol/l, II: 5.6--8.3 mmol/l, III: 8.4--11.0 mmol/l, IV: 11.1 mmol/l. The average age was 68+/-11 years with a peak CK of 1378+/-160 U/l, 34% were anterior wall AMIs and 52% were treated with thrombolysis. All patients had a long-term follow-up control at an average of 14.2 months. One year mortality rate was 19.3% and rose to 44% in patients with glucose levels >11.1 mmol/l. The mortality was higher in diabetic patients than in non-diabetic patients (40 vs. 16%; P<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed an independent effect of glucose level on mortality. In conclusions, our study in an unselected patient population demonstrates that admission plasma glucose level independently predicts 1 year mortality even in absence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Further studies evaluating the effect of acute insulin intervention in reducing mortality are warranted. SN - 0167-5273 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11461743/Impaired_glucose_metabolism_predicts_mortality_after_a_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167527301004223 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -