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Trends in blood lead levels among children--Boston, Massachusetts, 1994-1999.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2001 May 04; 50(17):337-9.MM

Abstract

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and national childhood blood lead surveillance data from 19 states indicated that average blood lead levels (BLLs) in young children decreased during the late 1990s (1-3). The proportion of children tested who had BLLs >10 microg/dL declined from 10.5% in 1996 to 7.6% in 1998, although the proportion was higher in certain counties (3). To determine whether a similar decline had occurred in Boston, Massachusetts, where a high proportion of children are tested each year, and whether any changes were similar in high- and low-risk neighborhoods, CDC, in collaboration with the Boston Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (BCLPPP) performed an analysis of BLLs among children aged 6-72 months in Boston during 1994-1999. The results indicate that BLLs in Boston declined during this period, but because of the geographic variation in lead exposure, continued surveillance will be necessary to eliminate childhood lead poisonings.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11465903

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Trends in Blood Lead Levels Among children--Boston, Massachusetts, 1994-1999." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 50, no. 17, 2001, pp. 337-9.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Trends in blood lead levels among children--Boston, Massachusetts, 1994-1999. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2001;50(17):337-9.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2001). Trends in blood lead levels among children--Boston, Massachusetts, 1994-1999. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 50(17), 337-9.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Trends in Blood Lead Levels Among children--Boston, Massachusetts, 1994-1999. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2001 May 4;50(17):337-9. PubMed PMID: 11465903.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in blood lead levels among children--Boston, Massachusetts, 1994-1999. A1 - ,, PY - 2001/7/24/pubmed PY - 2001/7/28/medline PY - 2001/7/24/entrez SP - 337 EP - 9 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 50 IS - 17 N2 - Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and national childhood blood lead surveillance data from 19 states indicated that average blood lead levels (BLLs) in young children decreased during the late 1990s (1-3). The proportion of children tested who had BLLs >10 microg/dL declined from 10.5% in 1996 to 7.6% in 1998, although the proportion was higher in certain counties (3). To determine whether a similar decline had occurred in Boston, Massachusetts, where a high proportion of children are tested each year, and whether any changes were similar in high- and low-risk neighborhoods, CDC, in collaboration with the Boston Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (BCLPPP) performed an analysis of BLLs among children aged 6-72 months in Boston during 1994-1999. The results indicate that BLLs in Boston declined during this period, but because of the geographic variation in lead exposure, continued surveillance will be necessary to eliminate childhood lead poisonings. SN - 0149-2195 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11465903/Trends_in_blood_lead_levels_among_children__Boston_Massachusetts_1994_1999_ L2 - http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5017a2.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -