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Energy cost of physical activity in cystic fibrosis.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2001; 55(8):690-7EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to compare the energy cost of standardized physical activity (ECA) between patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and healthy control subjects.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study using patients with CF and volunteers from the community.

SETTING

University laboratory.

SUBJECTS

Fifteen patients (age 24.6+/-4.6 y) recruited with consent from their treating physician and 16 healthy control subjects (age 25.3+/-3.2) recruited via local advertisement.

INTERVENTIONS

Patients and controls walked on a computerised treadmill at 1.5 km/h for 60 min followed by a 60 min recovery period and, on a second occasion, cycled at 0.5 kp (kilopond), 30 rpm followed by a 60 min recovery. The ECA was measured via indirect calorimetry. Resting energy expenditure (REE), nutritional status, pulmonary function and genotype were determined.

RESULTS

The REE in patients was significantly greater than the REE measured in controls (P=0.03) and was not related to the severity of lung disease or genotype. There was a significant difference between groups when comparing the ECA for walking kg radical FFM (P=0.001) and cycling kg radical FFM (P=0.04). The ECA for each activity was adjusted (ECA(adj)) for the contribution of REE (ECA kJ kg radical FFM 120 min(-1)--REE kJ kg radical FFM 120 min(-1)). ECA(adj) revealed a significant difference between groups for the walking protocol (P=0.001) but no difference for the cycling protocol (P=0.45). This finding may be related to the fact that the work rate during walking was more highly regulated than during cycling.

CONCLUSIONS

ECA in CF is increased and is likely to be explained by an additional energy-requiring component related to the exercise itself and not an increased REE.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Human Movement Studies, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. ml.richards@qut.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11477468

Citation

Richards, M L., et al. "Energy Cost of Physical Activity in Cystic Fibrosis." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 55, no. 8, 2001, pp. 690-7.
Richards ML, Davies PS, Bell SC. Energy cost of physical activity in cystic fibrosis. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001;55(8):690-7.
Richards, M. L., Davies, P. S., & Bell, S. C. (2001). Energy cost of physical activity in cystic fibrosis. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 55(8), pp. 690-7.
Richards ML, Davies PS, Bell SC. Energy Cost of Physical Activity in Cystic Fibrosis. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001;55(8):690-7. PubMed PMID: 11477468.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Energy cost of physical activity in cystic fibrosis. AU - Richards,M L, AU - Davies,P S, AU - Bell,S C, PY - 2000/08/10/received PY - 2001/01/22/revised PY - 2001/02/24/accepted PY - 2001/7/31/pubmed PY - 2001/9/8/medline PY - 2001/7/31/entrez SP - 690 EP - 7 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 55 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the energy cost of standardized physical activity (ECA) between patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and healthy control subjects. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study using patients with CF and volunteers from the community. SETTING: University laboratory. SUBJECTS: Fifteen patients (age 24.6+/-4.6 y) recruited with consent from their treating physician and 16 healthy control subjects (age 25.3+/-3.2) recruited via local advertisement. INTERVENTIONS: Patients and controls walked on a computerised treadmill at 1.5 km/h for 60 min followed by a 60 min recovery period and, on a second occasion, cycled at 0.5 kp (kilopond), 30 rpm followed by a 60 min recovery. The ECA was measured via indirect calorimetry. Resting energy expenditure (REE), nutritional status, pulmonary function and genotype were determined. RESULTS: The REE in patients was significantly greater than the REE measured in controls (P=0.03) and was not related to the severity of lung disease or genotype. There was a significant difference between groups when comparing the ECA for walking kg radical FFM (P=0.001) and cycling kg radical FFM (P=0.04). The ECA for each activity was adjusted (ECA(adj)) for the contribution of REE (ECA kJ kg radical FFM 120 min(-1)--REE kJ kg radical FFM 120 min(-1)). ECA(adj) revealed a significant difference between groups for the walking protocol (P=0.001) but no difference for the cycling protocol (P=0.45). This finding may be related to the fact that the work rate during walking was more highly regulated than during cycling. CONCLUSIONS: ECA in CF is increased and is likely to be explained by an additional energy-requiring component related to the exercise itself and not an increased REE. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11477468/Energy_cost_of_physical_activity_in_cystic_fibrosis_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601201 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -