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Fever in returned travelers: review of hospital admissions for a 3-year period.
Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Sep 01; 33(5):603-9.CI

Abstract

We reviewed 232 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary-care hospital under the care of an infectious diseases unit for management of febrile illness acquired overseas. A total of 53% presented to hospital within 1 week of return and 96% within 6 months. Malaria was the most common diagnosis (27% of patients), followed by respiratory tract infection (24%), gastroenteritis (14%), dengue fever (8%), and bacterial pneumonia (6%). Pretravel vaccination may have prevented a number of admissions, including influenza (n=11), typhoid fever (n=8) and hepatitis A (n=6). Compared to those who had not traveled to Africa, those who had were 6 times more likely to present with falciparum than nonfalciparum malaria. An itinerary that included Asia was associated with a 13-fold increased risk of dengue, but a lower risk of malaria. Palpable splenomegaly was associated with an 8-fold risk of malaria and hepatomegaly with a 4-fold risk of malaria. As a cause of fever, bacterial pneumonia was > or =5 times more likely in those who were aged >40 years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11486283

Citation

O'Brien, D, et al. "Fever in Returned Travelers: Review of Hospital Admissions for a 3-year Period." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 33, no. 5, 2001, pp. 603-9.
O'Brien D, Tobin S, Brown GV, et al. Fever in returned travelers: review of hospital admissions for a 3-year period. Clin Infect Dis. 2001;33(5):603-9.
O'Brien, D., Tobin, S., Brown, G. V., & Torresi, J. (2001). Fever in returned travelers: review of hospital admissions for a 3-year period. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 33(5), 603-9.
O'Brien D, et al. Fever in Returned Travelers: Review of Hospital Admissions for a 3-year Period. Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Sep 1;33(5):603-9. PubMed PMID: 11486283.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fever in returned travelers: review of hospital admissions for a 3-year period. AU - O'Brien,D, AU - Tobin,S, AU - Brown,G V, AU - Torresi,J, Y1 - 2001/08/06/ PY - 2000/09/14/received PY - 2000/12/27/revised PY - 2001/8/7/pubmed PY - 2001/11/3/medline PY - 2001/8/7/entrez SP - 603 EP - 9 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 33 IS - 5 N2 - We reviewed 232 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary-care hospital under the care of an infectious diseases unit for management of febrile illness acquired overseas. A total of 53% presented to hospital within 1 week of return and 96% within 6 months. Malaria was the most common diagnosis (27% of patients), followed by respiratory tract infection (24%), gastroenteritis (14%), dengue fever (8%), and bacterial pneumonia (6%). Pretravel vaccination may have prevented a number of admissions, including influenza (n=11), typhoid fever (n=8) and hepatitis A (n=6). Compared to those who had not traveled to Africa, those who had were 6 times more likely to present with falciparum than nonfalciparum malaria. An itinerary that included Asia was associated with a 13-fold increased risk of dengue, but a lower risk of malaria. Palpable splenomegaly was associated with an 8-fold risk of malaria and hepatomegaly with a 4-fold risk of malaria. As a cause of fever, bacterial pneumonia was > or =5 times more likely in those who were aged >40 years. SN - 1058-4838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11486283/Fever_in_returned_travelers:_review_of_hospital_admissions_for_a_3_year_period_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/322602 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -