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Dementia with Lewy bodies.
Ann Med Interne (Paris). 1998 Jun; 149(4):209-15.AM

Abstract

The presence of a high number of Lewy bodies--the morphological marker of Parkinson's disease--in the cerebral cortex of some cases of dementia has been frequently observed in association to Alzheimer type lesions (mainly senile plaques) and changes in the substantia nigra, that may be held responsible for the frequently associated symptoms of parkinsonism. The term "dementia with Lewy body" (DLB) has recently been suggested by a consensus conference and indicates that the pathogenetic mechanism of the dementia remains poorly understood. Marked fluctuations of alertness and of the cognitive performances, moderate parkinsonism and episodes of visual hallucinations may lead to suspect this diagnosis in cases of dementia. Unexplained falls, syncopes, delirium or alterations of consciousness may also be observed, and the patients may then be admitted in departments of internal medicine or geriatrics. The Lewy body is an intraneuronal spherical inclusion, present in Parkinson's disease. It is observed in the brainstem (substantia nigra, locus coeruleus, dorsal nucleus of the Xth nerve) and in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. The cortical Lewy bodies have a different aspect, but retain their antigenic characteristics: they are, in particular, stained by the antiubiquitin antibodies. Recently, they were found to be also labeled by antisynuclein antibodies. A mutation of the synuclein gene was recently identified in cases of familial Parkinson's disease. Clinically as well as pathologically, DLB may thus be difficult to distinguish from Alzheimer's disease on the one hand, and from Parkinson's disease, on the other. That diagnosis, however, is associated with a poor prognosis and should lead to specific therapeutic measures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service de Médecine Interne et Gériatrie, Hôpital Charles-Foix, 7, avenue de la République, F-94200 Ivry-sur-Seine.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11490548

Citation

Verny, M, and C Duyckaerts. "Dementia With Lewy Bodies." Annales De Medecine Interne, vol. 149, no. 4, 1998, pp. 209-15.
Verny M, Duyckaerts C. Dementia with Lewy bodies. Ann Med Interne (Paris). 1998;149(4):209-15.
Verny, M., & Duyckaerts, C. (1998). Dementia with Lewy bodies. Annales De Medecine Interne, 149(4), 209-15.
Verny M, Duyckaerts C. Dementia With Lewy Bodies. Ann Med Interne (Paris). 1998;149(4):209-15. PubMed PMID: 11490548.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dementia with Lewy bodies. AU - Verny,M, AU - Duyckaerts,C, PY - 2001/8/9/pubmed PY - 2001/9/21/medline PY - 2001/8/9/entrez SP - 209 EP - 15 JF - Annales de medecine interne JO - Ann Med Interne (Paris) VL - 149 IS - 4 N2 - The presence of a high number of Lewy bodies--the morphological marker of Parkinson's disease--in the cerebral cortex of some cases of dementia has been frequently observed in association to Alzheimer type lesions (mainly senile plaques) and changes in the substantia nigra, that may be held responsible for the frequently associated symptoms of parkinsonism. The term "dementia with Lewy body" (DLB) has recently been suggested by a consensus conference and indicates that the pathogenetic mechanism of the dementia remains poorly understood. Marked fluctuations of alertness and of the cognitive performances, moderate parkinsonism and episodes of visual hallucinations may lead to suspect this diagnosis in cases of dementia. Unexplained falls, syncopes, delirium or alterations of consciousness may also be observed, and the patients may then be admitted in departments of internal medicine or geriatrics. The Lewy body is an intraneuronal spherical inclusion, present in Parkinson's disease. It is observed in the brainstem (substantia nigra, locus coeruleus, dorsal nucleus of the Xth nerve) and in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. The cortical Lewy bodies have a different aspect, but retain their antigenic characteristics: they are, in particular, stained by the antiubiquitin antibodies. Recently, they were found to be also labeled by antisynuclein antibodies. A mutation of the synuclein gene was recently identified in cases of familial Parkinson's disease. Clinically as well as pathologically, DLB may thus be difficult to distinguish from Alzheimer's disease on the one hand, and from Parkinson's disease, on the other. That diagnosis, however, is associated with a poor prognosis and should lead to specific therapeutic measures. SN - 0003-410X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11490548/Dementia_with_Lewy_bodies_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alzheimersdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -