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Anti-transglutaminase IgA ELISA: clinical potential and drawbacks in celiac disease diagnosis.
Scand J Gastroenterol 2001; 36(8):849-53SJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Since the identification of tissue transglutaminase (tTG) as the antigen for the anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA), several antigen-specific immunoassays have been reported for celiac disease (CD) screening. A first objective was to evaluate the suitability for CD screening of three different IgA tTG ELISAs, two of them based on guinea pig liver tTG (gp-tTG) (an in-house ELISA with a partially purified extract and a commercial ELISA with purified gp-tTG antigen) and a third recombinant human tTG (rh-tTG) ELISA. The results are compared with EMA and with the final clinical diagnosis. A second objective was to analyze antibody reactivities in those patients with anti-tTG and EMA discrepancies.

METHODS

ELISA and EMA tests were used to measure IgA anti-tTG levels in sera from 259 patients (107 had CD and 72 had Type I diabetes mellitus).

RESULTS

The purified gp-tTG ELISA was highly sensitive (97.7%) and specific (98.8%) in the detection of CD, almost equaling EMA. Rh-tTG ELISA did not improved the sensitivity of EMA, but its specificity was slightly superior. Immunoblot analysis with partially purified gp-tTG extract, the antigen most frequently used for anti-tTG detection, showed that the majority of false positives were due to IgA reactivities to contaminant proteins present in the liver antigenic extract. This low specificity was particularly problematic in diabetics.

CONCLUSION

Purified tTG ELISAs, either with purified guinea pig liver or recombinant human antigens, can be used as quantitative and observer-independent alternatives to the traditional and time-consuming EMA in the screening of CD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Immunology Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11495081

Citation

Leon, F, et al. "Anti-transglutaminase IgA ELISA: Clinical Potential and Drawbacks in Celiac Disease Diagnosis." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 36, no. 8, 2001, pp. 849-53.
Leon F, Camarero C, R-Pena R, et al. Anti-transglutaminase IgA ELISA: clinical potential and drawbacks in celiac disease diagnosis. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2001;36(8):849-53.
Leon, F., Camarero, C., R-Pena, R., Eiras, P., Sanchez, L., Baragaño, M., ... Roy, G. (2001). Anti-transglutaminase IgA ELISA: clinical potential and drawbacks in celiac disease diagnosis. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 36(8), pp. 849-53.
Leon F, et al. Anti-transglutaminase IgA ELISA: Clinical Potential and Drawbacks in Celiac Disease Diagnosis. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2001;36(8):849-53. PubMed PMID: 11495081.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anti-transglutaminase IgA ELISA: clinical potential and drawbacks in celiac disease diagnosis. AU - Leon,F, AU - Camarero,C, AU - R-Pena,R, AU - Eiras,P, AU - Sanchez,L, AU - Baragaño,M, AU - Lombardia,M, AU - Bootello,A, AU - Roy,G, PY - 2001/8/10/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/8/10/entrez SP - 849 EP - 53 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 36 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Since the identification of tissue transglutaminase (tTG) as the antigen for the anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA), several antigen-specific immunoassays have been reported for celiac disease (CD) screening. A first objective was to evaluate the suitability for CD screening of three different IgA tTG ELISAs, two of them based on guinea pig liver tTG (gp-tTG) (an in-house ELISA with a partially purified extract and a commercial ELISA with purified gp-tTG antigen) and a third recombinant human tTG (rh-tTG) ELISA. The results are compared with EMA and with the final clinical diagnosis. A second objective was to analyze antibody reactivities in those patients with anti-tTG and EMA discrepancies. METHODS: ELISA and EMA tests were used to measure IgA anti-tTG levels in sera from 259 patients (107 had CD and 72 had Type I diabetes mellitus). RESULTS: The purified gp-tTG ELISA was highly sensitive (97.7%) and specific (98.8%) in the detection of CD, almost equaling EMA. Rh-tTG ELISA did not improved the sensitivity of EMA, but its specificity was slightly superior. Immunoblot analysis with partially purified gp-tTG extract, the antigen most frequently used for anti-tTG detection, showed that the majority of false positives were due to IgA reactivities to contaminant proteins present in the liver antigenic extract. This low specificity was particularly problematic in diabetics. CONCLUSION: Purified tTG ELISAs, either with purified guinea pig liver or recombinant human antigens, can be used as quantitative and observer-independent alternatives to the traditional and time-consuming EMA in the screening of CD. SN - 0036-5521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11495081/Anti_transglutaminase_IgA_ELISA:_clinical_potential_and_drawbacks_in_celiac_disease_diagnosis_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/003655201750313388 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -