Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Assessment and treatment of depression following myocardial infarction.
Am Fam Physician. 2001 Aug 15; 64(4):641-8.AF

Abstract

Approximately 65 percent of patients with acute myocardial infarction report experiencing symptoms of depression. Major depression is present in 15 to 22 percent of these patients. Depression is an independent risk factor in the development of and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease in otherwise healthy persons. Persons who are depressed and who have pre-existing cardiovascular disease have a 3.5 times greater risk of death than patients who are not depressed and have cardiovascular disease. Physicians can assess patients for depression by using one of several easily administered and scored self-report inventories, including the SIG E CAPS + mood mnemonic. Cognitive-behavior therapy is the preferred psychologic treatment. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants are the recommended pharmacologic treatment because of the relative absence of effects on the cardiovascular system. The combination of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with cognitive-behavior therapy is often the most effective treatment for depression in patients with cardiovascular disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Practice, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, Nebraska 68124, USA. tpguck@creighton.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11529263

Citation

Guck, T P., et al. "Assessment and Treatment of Depression Following Myocardial Infarction." American Family Physician, vol. 64, no. 4, 2001, pp. 641-8.
Guck TP, Kavan MG, Elsasser GN, et al. Assessment and treatment of depression following myocardial infarction. Am Fam Physician. 2001;64(4):641-8.
Guck, T. P., Kavan, M. G., Elsasser, G. N., & Barone, E. J. (2001). Assessment and treatment of depression following myocardial infarction. American Family Physician, 64(4), 641-8.
Guck TP, et al. Assessment and Treatment of Depression Following Myocardial Infarction. Am Fam Physician. 2001 Aug 15;64(4):641-8. PubMed PMID: 11529263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessment and treatment of depression following myocardial infarction. AU - Guck,T P, AU - Kavan,M G, AU - Elsasser,G N, AU - Barone,E J, PY - 2001/9/1/pubmed PY - 2001/9/28/medline PY - 2001/9/1/entrez SP - 641 EP - 8 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 64 IS - 4 N2 - Approximately 65 percent of patients with acute myocardial infarction report experiencing symptoms of depression. Major depression is present in 15 to 22 percent of these patients. Depression is an independent risk factor in the development of and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease in otherwise healthy persons. Persons who are depressed and who have pre-existing cardiovascular disease have a 3.5 times greater risk of death than patients who are not depressed and have cardiovascular disease. Physicians can assess patients for depression by using one of several easily administered and scored self-report inventories, including the SIG E CAPS + mood mnemonic. Cognitive-behavior therapy is the preferred psychologic treatment. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants are the recommended pharmacologic treatment because of the relative absence of effects on the cardiovascular system. The combination of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with cognitive-behavior therapy is often the most effective treatment for depression in patients with cardiovascular disease. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11529263/Assessment_and_treatment_of_depression_following_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=11529263 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -