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Prevalence of infectious diseases among internationally adopted children.
Pediatrics. 2001 Sep; 108(3):608-12.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Internationally adopted children are at increased risk of infections acquired in their country of origin. Ongoing surveillance of this unique population is needed to detect changing epidemiology and provide appropriate care.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective cohort study of 504 children adopted from abroad and evaluated from 1997 to 1998 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with various infectious diseases.

RESULTS

The mean age of the study participants at medical evaluation was 1.6 years; 71% were girls, and they were adopted from 16 countries, including China (48%), Russia (31%), Southeast Asia (8%), Eastern Europe (8%), and Latin America (5%). Overall, 75 (19%) of 404 children tested had tuberculin skin tests >/=10 mm, but all had normal chest radiographs. BCG vaccination (odds ratio [OR]: 7.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.29, 17.16) and being Russian born (OR: 2.90; 95% CI: 1.68, 5.00) were risk factors for latent tuberculosis infection. Fourteen (2.8%) children had detectable hepatitis B surface antigen, but no child had active hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus, or syphilis. Giardia lamblia antigen was detected in 87 (19%) of 461 tested children, and such children were older (mean: 22 months vs 15.5 months) and more likely to have been born in Eastern Europe (OR: 2.82; 95% CI: 1.70, 4.68).

CONCLUSIONS

We demonstrated increased rates of latent tuberculosis infection and G lamblia infection than previously reported. Thus, ongoing surveillance of internationally adopted children, international trends in infectious diseases, and appropriate screening will ensure the long-term health of adopted children as well as their families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University, College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA. ls5@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11533325

Citation

Saiman, L, et al. "Prevalence of Infectious Diseases Among Internationally Adopted Children." Pediatrics, vol. 108, no. 3, 2001, pp. 608-12.
Saiman L, Aronson J, Zhou J, et al. Prevalence of infectious diseases among internationally adopted children. Pediatrics. 2001;108(3):608-12.
Saiman, L., Aronson, J., Zhou, J., Gomez-Duarte, C., Gabriel, P. S., Alonso, M., Maloney, S., & Schulte, J. (2001). Prevalence of infectious diseases among internationally adopted children. Pediatrics, 108(3), 608-12.
Saiman L, et al. Prevalence of Infectious Diseases Among Internationally Adopted Children. Pediatrics. 2001;108(3):608-12. PubMed PMID: 11533325.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of infectious diseases among internationally adopted children. AU - Saiman,L, AU - Aronson,J, AU - Zhou,J, AU - Gomez-Duarte,C, AU - Gabriel,P S, AU - Alonso,M, AU - Maloney,S, AU - Schulte,J, PY - 2001/9/5/pubmed PY - 2001/10/19/medline PY - 2001/9/5/entrez SP - 608 EP - 12 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 108 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Internationally adopted children are at increased risk of infections acquired in their country of origin. Ongoing surveillance of this unique population is needed to detect changing epidemiology and provide appropriate care. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 504 children adopted from abroad and evaluated from 1997 to 1998 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with various infectious diseases. RESULTS: The mean age of the study participants at medical evaluation was 1.6 years; 71% were girls, and they were adopted from 16 countries, including China (48%), Russia (31%), Southeast Asia (8%), Eastern Europe (8%), and Latin America (5%). Overall, 75 (19%) of 404 children tested had tuberculin skin tests >/=10 mm, but all had normal chest radiographs. BCG vaccination (odds ratio [OR]: 7.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.29, 17.16) and being Russian born (OR: 2.90; 95% CI: 1.68, 5.00) were risk factors for latent tuberculosis infection. Fourteen (2.8%) children had detectable hepatitis B surface antigen, but no child had active hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus, or syphilis. Giardia lamblia antigen was detected in 87 (19%) of 461 tested children, and such children were older (mean: 22 months vs 15.5 months) and more likely to have been born in Eastern Europe (OR: 2.82; 95% CI: 1.70, 4.68). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated increased rates of latent tuberculosis infection and G lamblia infection than previously reported. Thus, ongoing surveillance of internationally adopted children, international trends in infectious diseases, and appropriate screening will ensure the long-term health of adopted children as well as their families. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11533325/Prevalence_of_infectious_diseases_among_internationally_adopted_children_ L2 - https://publications.aap.org/pediatrics/article-lookup/doi/10.1542/peds.108.3.608 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -