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Specific humoral immunity in mumps meningitis in children.
Med Sci Monit. 2001 Sep-Oct; 7(5):977-81.MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The pathogenesis of mumps meningitis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between IgM and IgG levels in blood and their relationship with the picture of CSF.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

We tested 40 children of both sexes aged 2-14 years. CSF was examined at admission (I) and after 12-14 days (II). Antibodies were measured four times: at admission (I), and after 2 (II), 4 (III), and 8 weeks (IV) by EIA (Behring). The results were expressed as delta absorbency.

RESULTS

The mean IgM level was respectively 0.403; 0.424; 0.317; 0.220. Significant differences were demonstrated between tests I and III and between III and IV. The mean IgG level was respectively 0.923; 1.322; 1.381 and 1.257. Significant differences were noted between tests I and II and between III and IV. We observed significant positive correlations between the IgM levels in tests I and II, II and III, and III and IV. The IgG concentrations significantly correlated in tests I and II, II and III, and II and IV. Significant negative correlations were noted between the IgG levels at test I and the IgM levels at test II. A negative correlation also appeared between the IgM level and CFS pleocytosis at admission, and between the IgM concentration and CSF pleocytosis after two weeks. A positive correlation was found between the IgG level at test I and the CSF glucose level in test II. In this study a high IgG level probably resulted in a lower IgM level at the next test. The IgM concentration at week 8 weeks was about 50% lower than its highest concentration (week 2), while the IgG level decreased simultaneously. The IgM concentration at hospital admission and two weeks later influenced CSF pleocytosis during these periods (higher IgM level - lower pleocytosis). A high IgG level at admission resulted in a lower CSF glucose concentration at the second examination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11535945

Citation

Kacprzak-Bergman, I, et al. "Specific Humoral Immunity in Mumps Meningitis in Children." Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, vol. 7, no. 5, 2001, pp. 977-81.
Kacprzak-Bergman I, Zaleska I, Jasonek J. Specific humoral immunity in mumps meningitis in children. Med Sci Monit. 2001;7(5):977-81.
Kacprzak-Bergman, I., Zaleska, I., & Jasonek, J. (2001). Specific humoral immunity in mumps meningitis in children. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, 7(5), 977-81.
Kacprzak-Bergman I, Zaleska I, Jasonek J. Specific Humoral Immunity in Mumps Meningitis in Children. Med Sci Monit. 2001 Sep-Oct;7(5):977-81. PubMed PMID: 11535945.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Specific humoral immunity in mumps meningitis in children. AU - Kacprzak-Bergman,I, AU - Zaleska,I, AU - Jasonek,J, PY - 2001/9/6/pubmed PY - 2002/1/18/medline PY - 2001/9/6/entrez SP - 977 EP - 81 JF - Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research JO - Med Sci Monit VL - 7 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of mumps meningitis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between IgM and IgG levels in blood and their relationship with the picture of CSF. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We tested 40 children of both sexes aged 2-14 years. CSF was examined at admission (I) and after 12-14 days (II). Antibodies were measured four times: at admission (I), and after 2 (II), 4 (III), and 8 weeks (IV) by EIA (Behring). The results were expressed as delta absorbency. RESULTS: The mean IgM level was respectively 0.403; 0.424; 0.317; 0.220. Significant differences were demonstrated between tests I and III and between III and IV. The mean IgG level was respectively 0.923; 1.322; 1.381 and 1.257. Significant differences were noted between tests I and II and between III and IV. We observed significant positive correlations between the IgM levels in tests I and II, II and III, and III and IV. The IgG concentrations significantly correlated in tests I and II, II and III, and II and IV. Significant negative correlations were noted between the IgG levels at test I and the IgM levels at test II. A negative correlation also appeared between the IgM level and CFS pleocytosis at admission, and between the IgM concentration and CSF pleocytosis after two weeks. A positive correlation was found between the IgG level at test I and the CSF glucose level in test II. In this study a high IgG level probably resulted in a lower IgM level at the next test. The IgM concentration at week 8 weeks was about 50% lower than its highest concentration (week 2), while the IgG level decreased simultaneously. The IgM concentration at hospital admission and two weeks later influenced CSF pleocytosis during these periods (higher IgM level - lower pleocytosis). A high IgG level at admission resulted in a lower CSF glucose concentration at the second examination. SN - 1234-1010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11535945/Specific_humoral_immunity_in_mumps_meningitis_in_children_ L2 - https://www.medscimonit.com/download/index/idArt/509129 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -