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Effects of workload preview on task scheduling during simulated instrument flight.
Int J Aviat Psychol. 1995; 5(1):5-23.IJ

Abstract

Our study examined pilot scheduling behavior in the context of simulated instrument flight. Over the course of the flight, pilots flew along specified routes while scheduling and performing several flight-related secondary tasks. The first phase of flight was flown under low-workload conditions, whereas the second phase of flight was flown under high-workload conditions in the form of increased turbulence and a disorganized instrument layout. Six pilots were randomly assigned to each of three workload preview groups. Subjects in the no-preview group were not given preview of the increased-workload conditions. Subjects in the declarative preview group were verbally informed of the nature of the flight workload manipulation but did not receive any practice under the high-workload conditions. Subjects in the procedural preview group received the same instructions as the declarative preview group but also flew half of the practice flight under the high-workload conditions. The results show that workload preview fostered efficient scheduling strategies. Specifically, those pilots with either declarative or procedural preview of future workload demands adopted an efficient strategy of scheduling more of the difficult secondary tasks during the low-workload phase of flight. However, those pilots given a procedural preview showed the greatest benefits in overall flight performance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Western Aerospace Labs, Inc., NASA Ames Research Center, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11541496

Citation

Andre, A D., et al. "Effects of Workload Preview On Task Scheduling During Simulated Instrument Flight." The International Journal of Aviation Psychology, vol. 5, no. 1, 1995, pp. 5-23.
Andre AD, Heers ST, Cashion PA. Effects of workload preview on task scheduling during simulated instrument flight. Int J Aviat Psychol. 1995;5(1):5-23.
Andre, A. D., Heers, S. T., & Cashion, P. A. (1995). Effects of workload preview on task scheduling during simulated instrument flight. The International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 5(1), 5-23.
Andre AD, Heers ST, Cashion PA. Effects of Workload Preview On Task Scheduling During Simulated Instrument Flight. Int J Aviat Psychol. 1995;5(1):5-23. PubMed PMID: 11541496.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of workload preview on task scheduling during simulated instrument flight. AU - Andre,A D, AU - Heers,S T, AU - Cashion,P A, PY - 1995/1/1/pubmed PY - 2001/9/11/medline PY - 1995/1/1/entrez SP - 5 EP - 23 JF - The International journal of aviation psychology JO - Int J Aviat Psychol VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - Our study examined pilot scheduling behavior in the context of simulated instrument flight. Over the course of the flight, pilots flew along specified routes while scheduling and performing several flight-related secondary tasks. The first phase of flight was flown under low-workload conditions, whereas the second phase of flight was flown under high-workload conditions in the form of increased turbulence and a disorganized instrument layout. Six pilots were randomly assigned to each of three workload preview groups. Subjects in the no-preview group were not given preview of the increased-workload conditions. Subjects in the declarative preview group were verbally informed of the nature of the flight workload manipulation but did not receive any practice under the high-workload conditions. Subjects in the procedural preview group received the same instructions as the declarative preview group but also flew half of the practice flight under the high-workload conditions. The results show that workload preview fostered efficient scheduling strategies. Specifically, those pilots with either declarative or procedural preview of future workload demands adopted an efficient strategy of scheduling more of the difficult secondary tasks during the low-workload phase of flight. However, those pilots given a procedural preview showed the greatest benefits in overall flight performance. SN - 1050-8414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11541496/Effects_of_workload_preview_on_task_scheduling_during_simulated_instrument_flight_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -