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Automation, task difficulty, and aircrew performance.
Mil Psychol. 1998; 10(4):259-74.MP

Abstract

The effects of an automated system on team processes and performance were assessed in a laboratory simulation. Two-person crews were required to fly a complex emergency-response scenario under conditions of low and high workload. These flights were completed with or without the aid of an autopilot. The results indicated that the autopilot was effective in reducing subjective workload. However, the automation was associated with improved performance on only 1 of 4 performance measures. Furthermore, it was observed that problem-solving performance was worse in the autopilot condition during the high-workload flights. Investigation of crew process data indicated that workload savings afforded by the autopilot might have been invested in more explicit coordination. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for military aviators' performance, system design, and team training.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11541776

Citation

Bowers, C, et al. "Automation, Task Difficulty, and Aircrew Performance." Military Psychology : the Official Journal of the Division of Military Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 10, no. 4, 1998, pp. 259-74.
Bowers C, Thornton C, Braun C, et al. Automation, task difficulty, and aircrew performance. Mil Psychol. 1998;10(4):259-74.
Bowers, C., Thornton, C., Braun, C., Morgan, B. B., & Salas, E. (1998). Automation, task difficulty, and aircrew performance. Military Psychology : the Official Journal of the Division of Military Psychology, American Psychological Association, 10(4), 259-74.
Bowers C, et al. Automation, Task Difficulty, and Aircrew Performance. Mil Psychol. 1998;10(4):259-74. PubMed PMID: 11541776.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Automation, task difficulty, and aircrew performance. AU - Bowers,C, AU - Thornton,C, AU - Braun,C, AU - Morgan,B B,Jr AU - Salas,E, PY - 2001/9/7/pubmed PY - 2001/9/11/medline PY - 2001/9/7/entrez SP - 259 EP - 74 JF - Military psychology : the official journal of the Division of Military Psychology, American Psychological Association JO - Mil Psychol VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - The effects of an automated system on team processes and performance were assessed in a laboratory simulation. Two-person crews were required to fly a complex emergency-response scenario under conditions of low and high workload. These flights were completed with or without the aid of an autopilot. The results indicated that the autopilot was effective in reducing subjective workload. However, the automation was associated with improved performance on only 1 of 4 performance measures. Furthermore, it was observed that problem-solving performance was worse in the autopilot condition during the high-workload flights. Investigation of crew process data indicated that workload savings afforded by the autopilot might have been invested in more explicit coordination. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for military aviators' performance, system design, and team training. SN - 0899-5605 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11541776/Automation_task_difficulty_and_aircrew_performance_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=11541776.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -