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The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States).

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the associations of dietary fat and selected plant foods with endometrial cancer in a population-based case-control study.

METHODS

Six hundred and seventy-nine incident cases of endometrial cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 1991, and 944 population-based controls completed a 98-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire and a detailed in-person interview which collected information on endometrial cancer risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) of endometrial cancer, adjusted for age, county, energy intake, hormone use, smoking and, in separate models, for body mass index (BMI: kg/m2).

RESULTS

Percent energy from fat was associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.6), with saturated and monounsaturated fats being the main contributors of risk. There was a stronger association between dietary fat and endometrial cancer among groups with higher circulating estrogen levels (i.e. women with higher BMI, users of unopposed estrogens, non-smokers, and younger age at menarche). Consumption of fruits or vegetables was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.93 and OR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.43-0.88, respectively). Further adjustment for BMI resulted in little or no attenuation of the ORs and associated CIs.

CONCLUSIONS

These results provide support for the theory that a low-fat, high-fruit and high-vegetable diet may reduce the risk of endometrial cancer, and that these dietary factors may act independently of the effect of BMI.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. alittman@fhcrc.org

    ,

    Source

    Cancer causes & control : CCC 12:8 2001 Oct pg 691-702

    MeSH

    Aged
    Body Mass Index
    Case-Control Studies
    Dietary Fats
    Endometrial Neoplasms
    Female
    Fruit
    Humans
    Logistic Models
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Reproductive History
    Risk Factors
    United States
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11562109

    Citation

    Littman, A J., et al. "The Association of Dietary Fat and Plant Foods With Endometrial Cancer (United States)." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 12, no. 8, 2001, pp. 691-702.
    Littman AJ, Beresford SA, White E. The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2001;12(8):691-702.
    Littman, A. J., Beresford, S. A., & White, E. (2001). The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States). Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 12(8), pp. 691-702.
    Littman AJ, Beresford SA, White E. The Association of Dietary Fat and Plant Foods With Endometrial Cancer (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2001;12(8):691-702. PubMed PMID: 11562109.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States). AU - Littman,A J, AU - Beresford,S A, AU - White,E, PY - 2001/9/20/pubmed PY - 2002/1/23/medline PY - 2001/9/20/entrez SP - 691 EP - 702 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 12 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of dietary fat and selected plant foods with endometrial cancer in a population-based case-control study. METHODS: Six hundred and seventy-nine incident cases of endometrial cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 1991, and 944 population-based controls completed a 98-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire and a detailed in-person interview which collected information on endometrial cancer risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) of endometrial cancer, adjusted for age, county, energy intake, hormone use, smoking and, in separate models, for body mass index (BMI: kg/m2). RESULTS: Percent energy from fat was associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.6), with saturated and monounsaturated fats being the main contributors of risk. There was a stronger association between dietary fat and endometrial cancer among groups with higher circulating estrogen levels (i.e. women with higher BMI, users of unopposed estrogens, non-smokers, and younger age at menarche). Consumption of fruits or vegetables was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.93 and OR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.43-0.88, respectively). Further adjustment for BMI resulted in little or no attenuation of the ORs and associated CIs. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide support for the theory that a low-fat, high-fruit and high-vegetable diet may reduce the risk of endometrial cancer, and that these dietary factors may act independently of the effect of BMI. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11562109/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=11562109.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -