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The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States).
Cancer Causes Control 2001; 12(8):691-702CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the associations of dietary fat and selected plant foods with endometrial cancer in a population-based case-control study.

METHODS

Six hundred and seventy-nine incident cases of endometrial cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 1991, and 944 population-based controls completed a 98-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire and a detailed in-person interview which collected information on endometrial cancer risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) of endometrial cancer, adjusted for age, county, energy intake, hormone use, smoking and, in separate models, for body mass index (BMI: kg/m2).

RESULTS

Percent energy from fat was associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.6), with saturated and monounsaturated fats being the main contributors of risk. There was a stronger association between dietary fat and endometrial cancer among groups with higher circulating estrogen levels (i.e. women with higher BMI, users of unopposed estrogens, non-smokers, and younger age at menarche). Consumption of fruits or vegetables was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.93 and OR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.43-0.88, respectively). Further adjustment for BMI resulted in little or no attenuation of the ORs and associated CIs.

CONCLUSIONS

These results provide support for the theory that a low-fat, high-fruit and high-vegetable diet may reduce the risk of endometrial cancer, and that these dietary factors may act independently of the effect of BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. alittman@fhcrc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11562109

Citation

Littman, A J., et al. "The Association of Dietary Fat and Plant Foods With Endometrial Cancer (United States)." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 12, no. 8, 2001, pp. 691-702.
Littman AJ, Beresford SA, White E. The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2001;12(8):691-702.
Littman, A. J., Beresford, S. A., & White, E. (2001). The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States). Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 12(8), pp. 691-702.
Littman AJ, Beresford SA, White E. The Association of Dietary Fat and Plant Foods With Endometrial Cancer (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2001;12(8):691-702. PubMed PMID: 11562109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States). AU - Littman,A J, AU - Beresford,S A, AU - White,E, PY - 2001/9/20/pubmed PY - 2002/1/23/medline PY - 2001/9/20/entrez SP - 691 EP - 702 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 12 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of dietary fat and selected plant foods with endometrial cancer in a population-based case-control study. METHODS: Six hundred and seventy-nine incident cases of endometrial cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 1991, and 944 population-based controls completed a 98-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire and a detailed in-person interview which collected information on endometrial cancer risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) of endometrial cancer, adjusted for age, county, energy intake, hormone use, smoking and, in separate models, for body mass index (BMI: kg/m2). RESULTS: Percent energy from fat was associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.6), with saturated and monounsaturated fats being the main contributors of risk. There was a stronger association between dietary fat and endometrial cancer among groups with higher circulating estrogen levels (i.e. women with higher BMI, users of unopposed estrogens, non-smokers, and younger age at menarche). Consumption of fruits or vegetables was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk (highest quintile cf. lowest: OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.93 and OR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.43-0.88, respectively). Further adjustment for BMI resulted in little or no attenuation of the ORs and associated CIs. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide support for the theory that a low-fat, high-fruit and high-vegetable diet may reduce the risk of endometrial cancer, and that these dietary factors may act independently of the effect of BMI. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11562109/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=11562109.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -