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Nutrition and cognitive impairment in the elderly.

Abstract

As the number of older people is growing rapidly worldwide and the fact that elderly people are also apparently living longer, dementia, the most common cause of cognitive impairment is getting to be a greater public health problem. Nutrition plays a role in the ageing process, but there is still a lack of knowledge about nutrition-related risk factors in cognitive impairment. Research in this area has been intensive during the last decade, and results indicate that subclinical deficiency in essential nutrients (antioxidants such as vitamins C, E and beta-carotene, vitamin B(12), vitamin B(6), folate) and nutrition-related disorders, as hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriacylglycerolaemia, hypertension, and diabetes could be some of the nutrition-related risk factors, which can be present for a long time before cognitive impairment becomes evident. Large-scale clinical trials in high-risk populations are needed to determine whether lowering blood homocysteine levels reduces the risk of cognitive impairment and may delay the clinical onset of dementia and perhaps of Alzheimer's disease. A curative treatment of cognitive impairment, especially Alzheimer's disease, is currently impossible. Actual drug therapy, if started early enough, may slow down the progression of the disease. Longitudinal studies are required in order to establish the possible link of nutrient intake--nutritional status with cognitive impairment, and if it is possible, in fact, to inhibit or delay the onset of dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Institut für Ernährungswissenschaft, Abteilung Pathophysiologie der Ernährung, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, D-53115 Bonn, Germany. mggross@canal21.com

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Source

The British journal of nutrition 86:3 2001 Sep pg 313-21

MeSH

Aged
Aging
Alzheimer Disease
Antioxidants
Avitaminosis
Dementia
Dementia, Vascular
Dietary Supplements
Educational Status
Folic Acid
Folic Acid Deficiency
Homocysteine
Humans
Hypertension
Life Style
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Status
Risk Factors
Stroke
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11570983

Citation

González-Gross, M, et al. "Nutrition and Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 86, no. 3, 2001, pp. 313-21.
González-Gross M, Marcos A, Pietrzik K. Nutrition and cognitive impairment in the elderly. Br J Nutr. 2001;86(3):313-21.
González-Gross, M., Marcos, A., & Pietrzik, K. (2001). Nutrition and cognitive impairment in the elderly. The British Journal of Nutrition, 86(3), pp. 313-21.
González-Gross M, Marcos A, Pietrzik K. Nutrition and Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly. Br J Nutr. 2001;86(3):313-21. PubMed PMID: 11570983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition and cognitive impairment in the elderly. AU - González-Gross,M, AU - Marcos,A, AU - Pietrzik,K, PY - 2001/9/26/pubmed PY - 2001/10/26/medline PY - 2001/9/26/entrez SP - 313 EP - 21 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 86 IS - 3 N2 - As the number of older people is growing rapidly worldwide and the fact that elderly people are also apparently living longer, dementia, the most common cause of cognitive impairment is getting to be a greater public health problem. Nutrition plays a role in the ageing process, but there is still a lack of knowledge about nutrition-related risk factors in cognitive impairment. Research in this area has been intensive during the last decade, and results indicate that subclinical deficiency in essential nutrients (antioxidants such as vitamins C, E and beta-carotene, vitamin B(12), vitamin B(6), folate) and nutrition-related disorders, as hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriacylglycerolaemia, hypertension, and diabetes could be some of the nutrition-related risk factors, which can be present for a long time before cognitive impairment becomes evident. Large-scale clinical trials in high-risk populations are needed to determine whether lowering blood homocysteine levels reduces the risk of cognitive impairment and may delay the clinical onset of dementia and perhaps of Alzheimer's disease. A curative treatment of cognitive impairment, especially Alzheimer's disease, is currently impossible. Actual drug therapy, if started early enough, may slow down the progression of the disease. Longitudinal studies are required in order to establish the possible link of nutrient intake--nutritional status with cognitive impairment, and if it is possible, in fact, to inhibit or delay the onset of dementia. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11570983/Nutrition_and_cognitive_impairment_in_the_elderly_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dementia.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -