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Relationship of blood trace elements to liver damage, nutritional status, and oxidative stress in chronic nonalcoholic liver disease.

Abstract

Trace elements are involved in chronic liver diseases because these elements may have a direct hepatic toxicity or may be decreased as a consequence of the impaired liver function, particularly in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and/or malnutrition. In this study, we determined plasma and erythrocytes trace elements in 50 inpatients with nonalcoholic chronic liver disease (11 with biopsy-proven chronic hepatitis, 39 with cirrhosis [16 in stage A according to Child-Pugh criteria, 23 Child B+C]), and in a control group of 10 healthy subjects by the proton induced x-ray emission method. The relationship between trace element concentration and the extent of liver damage, the nutritional status (by anthropometric evaluations), and various blood markers of oxidative stress--reduced glutathione, total lipoperoxides and malonyldialdehyde--was investigated. We found that cirrhotics had a significant decrease of Fe, Zn, Se, and GSH levels in the plasma and of GSH and Se in the erythrocytes with respect to the control and chronic hepatitis groups. GSH levels were related to the degree of liver damage; a significant direct correlation was observed among Se, Zn, and GSH plasma values and between GSH and Se in the erythrocytes. The trace element decrease was, on the contrary, independent of the degree of liver function impairment and only partially affected by the nutritional status. Data indicate that liver cirrhosis, even if not alcohol related, induces a decrease of Se and Zn and that, in these patients, an oxidative stress is present, as documented by the significant correlation between Se and GSH. The plasma Br level was higher in cirrhotics with respect to the control and chronic hepatitis groups.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerche su Alimenti, Nutrizione e Apparato Digerente, Facoltà di Medicina, Seconda Università, Naples, Italy.

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    Source

    Biological trace element research 81:3 2001 Sep pg 245-54

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Erythrocytes
    Glutathione
    Humans
    Iron
    Lipid Peroxides
    Liver
    Liver Cirrhosis
    Liver Diseases
    Malondialdehyde
    Middle Aged
    Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Oxidative Stress
    Selenium
    Trace Elements
    X-Rays
    Zinc

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11575681

    Citation

    Loguercio, C, et al. "Relationship of Blood Trace Elements to Liver Damage, Nutritional Status, and Oxidative Stress in Chronic Nonalcoholic Liver Disease." Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 81, no. 3, 2001, pp. 245-54.
    Loguercio C, De Girolamo V, Federico A, et al. Relationship of blood trace elements to liver damage, nutritional status, and oxidative stress in chronic nonalcoholic liver disease. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2001;81(3):245-54.
    Loguercio, C., De Girolamo, V., Federico, A., Feng, S. L., Crafa, E., Cataldi, V., ... Del Vecchio Blanco, C. (2001). Relationship of blood trace elements to liver damage, nutritional status, and oxidative stress in chronic nonalcoholic liver disease. Biological Trace Element Research, 81(3), pp. 245-54.
    Loguercio C, et al. Relationship of Blood Trace Elements to Liver Damage, Nutritional Status, and Oxidative Stress in Chronic Nonalcoholic Liver Disease. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2001;81(3):245-54. PubMed PMID: 11575681.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship of blood trace elements to liver damage, nutritional status, and oxidative stress in chronic nonalcoholic liver disease. AU - Loguercio,C, AU - De Girolamo,V, AU - Federico,A, AU - Feng,S L, AU - Crafa,E, AU - Cataldi,V, AU - Gialanella,G, AU - Moro,R, AU - Del Vecchio Blanco,C, PY - 2001/9/29/pubmed PY - 2002/3/5/medline PY - 2001/9/29/entrez SP - 245 EP - 54 JF - Biological trace element research JO - Biol Trace Elem Res VL - 81 IS - 3 N2 - Trace elements are involved in chronic liver diseases because these elements may have a direct hepatic toxicity or may be decreased as a consequence of the impaired liver function, particularly in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and/or malnutrition. In this study, we determined plasma and erythrocytes trace elements in 50 inpatients with nonalcoholic chronic liver disease (11 with biopsy-proven chronic hepatitis, 39 with cirrhosis [16 in stage A according to Child-Pugh criteria, 23 Child B+C]), and in a control group of 10 healthy subjects by the proton induced x-ray emission method. The relationship between trace element concentration and the extent of liver damage, the nutritional status (by anthropometric evaluations), and various blood markers of oxidative stress--reduced glutathione, total lipoperoxides and malonyldialdehyde--was investigated. We found that cirrhotics had a significant decrease of Fe, Zn, Se, and GSH levels in the plasma and of GSH and Se in the erythrocytes with respect to the control and chronic hepatitis groups. GSH levels were related to the degree of liver damage; a significant direct correlation was observed among Se, Zn, and GSH plasma values and between GSH and Se in the erythrocytes. The trace element decrease was, on the contrary, independent of the degree of liver function impairment and only partially affected by the nutritional status. Data indicate that liver cirrhosis, even if not alcohol related, induces a decrease of Se and Zn and that, in these patients, an oxidative stress is present, as documented by the significant correlation between Se and GSH. The plasma Br level was higher in cirrhotics with respect to the control and chronic hepatitis groups. SN - 0163-4984 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11575681/Relationship_of_blood_trace_elements_to_liver_damage_nutritional_status_and_oxidative_stress_in_chronic_nonalcoholic_liver_disease_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1385/BTER:81:3:245 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -