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Variant effect of first- and second-generation antihistamines as clues to their mechanism of action on the sneeze reflex in the common cold.

Abstract

Treatment with first-generation antihistamines reduces sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal mucus weight, and, in some instances, cough in subjects with experimental or natural colds; however, treatment with second-generation antihistamines has not been effective for these complaints in trials in subjects with natural colds. This article reports the negative results of a clinical trial with loratadine, a second-generation antihistamine, in adults in the rhinovirus challenge model. This finding in the highly controlled setting of the challenge model confirms the earlier negative studies with second-generation antihistamines in natural colds. First-generation antihistamines block both histaminic and muscarinic receptors as well as passing the blood-brain barrier. Second-generation antihistamines mainly block histaminic receptors and do not pass the blood-brain barrier. The effectiveness of first-generation antihistamines in blocking sneezing in colds may be due primarily to neuropharmacological manipulation of histaminic and muscarinic receptors in the medulla.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Aachen Medical School, Aachen, Germany.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Common Cold
    Histamine H1 Antagonists
    Humans
    Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
    Loratadine
    Mucus
    Rhinovirus
    Sneezing
    Treatment Outcome
    Viral Load

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11588693

    Citation

    Muether, P S., and J M. Gwaltney. "Variant Effect of First- and Second-generation Antihistamines as Clues to Their Mechanism of Action On the Sneeze Reflex in the Common Cold." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 33, no. 9, 2001, pp. 1483-8.
    Muether PS, Gwaltney JM. Variant effect of first- and second-generation antihistamines as clues to their mechanism of action on the sneeze reflex in the common cold. Clin Infect Dis. 2001;33(9):1483-8.
    Muether, P. S., & Gwaltney, J. M. (2001). Variant effect of first- and second-generation antihistamines as clues to their mechanism of action on the sneeze reflex in the common cold. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 33(9), pp. 1483-8.
    Muether PS, Gwaltney JM. Variant Effect of First- and Second-generation Antihistamines as Clues to Their Mechanism of Action On the Sneeze Reflex in the Common Cold. Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Nov 1;33(9):1483-8. PubMed PMID: 11588693.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Variant effect of first- and second-generation antihistamines as clues to their mechanism of action on the sneeze reflex in the common cold. AU - Muether,P S, AU - Gwaltney,J M,Jr Y1 - 2001/10/04/ PY - 2001/01/17/received PY - 2001/04/18/revised PY - 2001/10/6/pubmed PY - 2002/1/10/medline PY - 2001/10/6/entrez SP - 1483 EP - 8 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 33 IS - 9 N2 - Treatment with first-generation antihistamines reduces sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal mucus weight, and, in some instances, cough in subjects with experimental or natural colds; however, treatment with second-generation antihistamines has not been effective for these complaints in trials in subjects with natural colds. This article reports the negative results of a clinical trial with loratadine, a second-generation antihistamine, in adults in the rhinovirus challenge model. This finding in the highly controlled setting of the challenge model confirms the earlier negative studies with second-generation antihistamines in natural colds. First-generation antihistamines block both histaminic and muscarinic receptors as well as passing the blood-brain barrier. Second-generation antihistamines mainly block histaminic receptors and do not pass the blood-brain barrier. The effectiveness of first-generation antihistamines in blocking sneezing in colds may be due primarily to neuropharmacological manipulation of histaminic and muscarinic receptors in the medulla. SN - 1058-4838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11588693/Variant_effect_of_first__and_second_generation_antihistamines_as_clues_to_their_mechanism_of_action_on_the_sneeze_reflex_in_the_common_cold_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/322518 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -