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Differential effects of delta 9-THC on spatial reference and working memory in mice.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2001 Sep; 157(2):142-50.P

Abstract

RATIONALE

Marijuana remains the most widely used illicit drug in the U.S., and recent attention has been given to putative therapeutic uses of marijuana and cannabinoid derivatives. Thus, developing a better understanding of delta9-THC (tetrahydrocannabinol)-induced mnemonic deficits is of critical importance.

OBJECTIVES

These experiments were conducted to determine whether delta9-THC has differential effects on spatial reference and working memory tasks, to investigate its receptor mechanism of action, and to compare these effects with those produced by two other compounds--scopolamine and phencyclidine--known to produce mnemonic deficits. In addition, the potency of delta9-THC in these memory tasks was compared with its potency in other pharmacological effects traditionally associated with cannabinoid activity.

METHODS

Two different versions of the Morris water maze were employed: a working memory task and a reference memory task. Other effects of delta9-THC were assessed using standard tests of hypomotility, antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia.

RESULTS

delta9-THC disrupted performance of the working memory task (3.0 mg/kg) at doses lower than those required to disrupt performance of the reference memory task (100 mg/kg), or elicit hypomotility, antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia. These performance deficits were reversed by SR 141716A. The effects of delta9-THC resembled those of scopolamine, which also selectively disrupted the working maze task. Conversely, phencyclidine disrupted both tasks only at a dose that also produced motor deficits.

CONCLUSIONS

These data indicate that delta9-THC selectively impairs performance of a working memory task through a CB, receptor mechanism of action and that these memory disruptions are more sensitive than other pharmacological effects of delta9-THC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, VCU, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11594438

Citation

Varvel, S A., et al. "Differential Effects of Delta 9-THC On Spatial Reference and Working Memory in Mice." Psychopharmacology, vol. 157, no. 2, 2001, pp. 142-50.
Varvel SA, Hamm RJ, Martin BR, et al. Differential effects of delta 9-THC on spatial reference and working memory in mice. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2001;157(2):142-50.
Varvel, S. A., Hamm, R. J., Martin, B. R., & Lichtman, A. H. (2001). Differential effects of delta 9-THC on spatial reference and working memory in mice. Psychopharmacology, 157(2), 142-50.
Varvel SA, et al. Differential Effects of Delta 9-THC On Spatial Reference and Working Memory in Mice. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2001;157(2):142-50. PubMed PMID: 11594438.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differential effects of delta 9-THC on spatial reference and working memory in mice. AU - Varvel,S A, AU - Hamm,R J, AU - Martin,B R, AU - Lichtman,A H, PY - 2001/10/12/pubmed PY - 2002/2/28/medline PY - 2001/10/12/entrez SP - 142 EP - 50 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl) VL - 157 IS - 2 N2 - RATIONALE: Marijuana remains the most widely used illicit drug in the U.S., and recent attention has been given to putative therapeutic uses of marijuana and cannabinoid derivatives. Thus, developing a better understanding of delta9-THC (tetrahydrocannabinol)-induced mnemonic deficits is of critical importance. OBJECTIVES: These experiments were conducted to determine whether delta9-THC has differential effects on spatial reference and working memory tasks, to investigate its receptor mechanism of action, and to compare these effects with those produced by two other compounds--scopolamine and phencyclidine--known to produce mnemonic deficits. In addition, the potency of delta9-THC in these memory tasks was compared with its potency in other pharmacological effects traditionally associated with cannabinoid activity. METHODS: Two different versions of the Morris water maze were employed: a working memory task and a reference memory task. Other effects of delta9-THC were assessed using standard tests of hypomotility, antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia. RESULTS: delta9-THC disrupted performance of the working memory task (3.0 mg/kg) at doses lower than those required to disrupt performance of the reference memory task (100 mg/kg), or elicit hypomotility, antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia. These performance deficits were reversed by SR 141716A. The effects of delta9-THC resembled those of scopolamine, which also selectively disrupted the working maze task. Conversely, phencyclidine disrupted both tasks only at a dose that also produced motor deficits. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that delta9-THC selectively impairs performance of a working memory task through a CB, receptor mechanism of action and that these memory disruptions are more sensitive than other pharmacological effects of delta9-THC. SN - 0033-3158 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11594438/Differential_effects_of_delta_9_THC_on_spatial_reference_and_working_memory_in_mice_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002130100780 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -