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Dietary chloride as a possible determinant of the severity of exercise-induced asthma.
Eur J Appl Physiol 2001; 85(5):450-6EJ

Abstract

Dietary sodium chloride (NaCl) has been shown to alter the severity of exercise-induced asthma, but it is not known if the sodium and chloride ions have independent effects in this regard. The hypothesis tested in the present study was that both a low sodium, low chloride diet and a high sodium, low chloride diet would improve post-exercise pulmonary function in subjects with exercise-induced asthma (EIA) compared to a normal NaCl diet (NSD); but that neither of these diets would have an effect on post-exercise pulmonary function in control (non-EIA) subjects. Eight subjects who suffered from EIA and eight subjects who did not (control) took part in a double-blind crossover study. Pre- and post-exercise pulmonary function was assessed after 2 weeks on a NSD, a low NaCl diet (LSD, low sodium, low chloride) or a sodium bicarbonate diet (NaHCO3 diet, high sodium, low chloride). A 1 week washout period occurred between diets. Altering dietary sodium or chloride had no effect on pre-exercise (baseline) pulmonary function in either group or on post-exercise pulmonary function in control subjects. However, both the LSD and the NaHCO3 diet lessened the deterioration in post-exercise pulmonary function in EIA subjects. Comparing results from pre- to post-exercise, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at 15 min post-exercise differed significantly (P < 0.05) between diets [mean (SEM) 7 (4)% on the LSD, 14 (4)% on the NaHCO3 diet, and 19 (2)% on the NSD]. Similar patterns were observed for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow rate at 25%-75% FVC and peak expiratory flow rate. The NaHCO3 diet lessened the deterioration of post-exercise pulmonary function, but not to the extent of LSD. These data suggest that both sodium and chloride contribute to the worsening of EIA symptoms seen after consuming a normal or high NaCl diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Sport Science, Physical Education and Recreation, University of Wales Institute, Cardiff, UK. Tmickleborough@uwic.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11606014

Citation

Mickleborough, T D., et al. "Dietary Chloride as a Possible Determinant of the Severity of Exercise-induced Asthma." European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 85, no. 5, 2001, pp. 450-6.
Mickleborough TD, Gotshall RW, Kluka EM, et al. Dietary chloride as a possible determinant of the severity of exercise-induced asthma. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2001;85(5):450-6.
Mickleborough, T. D., Gotshall, R. W., Kluka, E. M., Miller, C. W., & Cordain, L. (2001). Dietary chloride as a possible determinant of the severity of exercise-induced asthma. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 85(5), pp. 450-6.
Mickleborough TD, et al. Dietary Chloride as a Possible Determinant of the Severity of Exercise-induced Asthma. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2001;85(5):450-6. PubMed PMID: 11606014.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary chloride as a possible determinant of the severity of exercise-induced asthma. AU - Mickleborough,T D, AU - Gotshall,R W, AU - Kluka,E M, AU - Miller,C W, AU - Cordain,L, PY - 2001/10/19/pubmed PY - 2002/3/13/medline PY - 2001/10/19/entrez SP - 450 EP - 6 JF - European journal of applied physiology JO - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. VL - 85 IS - 5 N2 - Dietary sodium chloride (NaCl) has been shown to alter the severity of exercise-induced asthma, but it is not known if the sodium and chloride ions have independent effects in this regard. The hypothesis tested in the present study was that both a low sodium, low chloride diet and a high sodium, low chloride diet would improve post-exercise pulmonary function in subjects with exercise-induced asthma (EIA) compared to a normal NaCl diet (NSD); but that neither of these diets would have an effect on post-exercise pulmonary function in control (non-EIA) subjects. Eight subjects who suffered from EIA and eight subjects who did not (control) took part in a double-blind crossover study. Pre- and post-exercise pulmonary function was assessed after 2 weeks on a NSD, a low NaCl diet (LSD, low sodium, low chloride) or a sodium bicarbonate diet (NaHCO3 diet, high sodium, low chloride). A 1 week washout period occurred between diets. Altering dietary sodium or chloride had no effect on pre-exercise (baseline) pulmonary function in either group or on post-exercise pulmonary function in control subjects. However, both the LSD and the NaHCO3 diet lessened the deterioration in post-exercise pulmonary function in EIA subjects. Comparing results from pre- to post-exercise, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at 15 min post-exercise differed significantly (P < 0.05) between diets [mean (SEM) 7 (4)% on the LSD, 14 (4)% on the NaHCO3 diet, and 19 (2)% on the NSD]. Similar patterns were observed for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow rate at 25%-75% FVC and peak expiratory flow rate. The NaHCO3 diet lessened the deterioration of post-exercise pulmonary function, but not to the extent of LSD. These data suggest that both sodium and chloride contribute to the worsening of EIA symptoms seen after consuming a normal or high NaCl diet. SN - 1439-6319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11606014/Dietary_chloride_as_a_possible_determinant_of_the_severity_of_exercise_induced_asthma_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s004210100478 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -