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Early life risk factors for adult asthma: a birth cohort study of subjects at risk.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001 Nov; 108(5):720-5.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prediction of adult asthma is important, and early prevention strategies should be targeted at those most at risk. Identifying high-risk children at an early age, however, is currently difficult.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to determine those factors present in early life that predict an increased risk of adult asthma.

METHODS

A prospective cohort study of subjects at risk of asthma and atopy was undertaken in Poole, England. One hundred babies of atopic parents were recruited at birth. During the first 5 years of life, subjects were recalled annually, all respiratory events were reported, and skin prick tests and total serum IgE measurements were performed. At 11 and 22 years, bronchial hyperresponsiveness was also measured. Seventy-three subjects were followed up at 5 years, 67 at 11 years, and 63 at 22 years.

RESULTS

Twenty-three (37%) adult subjects reported wheezing within the previous 12 months. Fifteen (25%) of these subjects showed signs of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and were regarded as asthmatic. Wheezing before the age of 2 years occurred in 28% and was not significantly related to adult asthma (odds ratio, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.03-1.7; P = .19). A positive skin prick test response to hen's egg, cow's milk, or both in the first year was independently predictive of adult asthma (odds ratio, 10.7; 95% CI, 2.1-55.1; P = .001; sensitivity, 57%; specificity, 89%).

CONCLUSION

Prediction of adult asthma remains difficult. In this study of subjects at risk of atopy, skin sensitivity to hen's egg or cow's milk in the first year was predictive of adult asthma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, Poole Hospital, Bournemouth, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11692095

Citation

Rhodes, H L., et al. "Early Life Risk Factors for Adult Asthma: a Birth Cohort Study of Subjects at Risk." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 108, no. 5, 2001, pp. 720-5.
Rhodes HL, Sporik R, Thomas P, et al. Early life risk factors for adult asthma: a birth cohort study of subjects at risk. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001;108(5):720-5.
Rhodes, H. L., Sporik, R., Thomas, P., Holgate, S. T., & Cogswell, J. J. (2001). Early life risk factors for adult asthma: a birth cohort study of subjects at risk. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 108(5), 720-5.
Rhodes HL, et al. Early Life Risk Factors for Adult Asthma: a Birth Cohort Study of Subjects at Risk. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001;108(5):720-5. PubMed PMID: 11692095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early life risk factors for adult asthma: a birth cohort study of subjects at risk. AU - Rhodes,H L, AU - Sporik,R, AU - Thomas,P, AU - Holgate,S T, AU - Cogswell,J J, PY - 2001/11/3/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/3/entrez SP - 720 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 108 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prediction of adult asthma is important, and early prevention strategies should be targeted at those most at risk. Identifying high-risk children at an early age, however, is currently difficult. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine those factors present in early life that predict an increased risk of adult asthma. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of subjects at risk of asthma and atopy was undertaken in Poole, England. One hundred babies of atopic parents were recruited at birth. During the first 5 years of life, subjects were recalled annually, all respiratory events were reported, and skin prick tests and total serum IgE measurements were performed. At 11 and 22 years, bronchial hyperresponsiveness was also measured. Seventy-three subjects were followed up at 5 years, 67 at 11 years, and 63 at 22 years. RESULTS: Twenty-three (37%) adult subjects reported wheezing within the previous 12 months. Fifteen (25%) of these subjects showed signs of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and were regarded as asthmatic. Wheezing before the age of 2 years occurred in 28% and was not significantly related to adult asthma (odds ratio, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.03-1.7; P = .19). A positive skin prick test response to hen's egg, cow's milk, or both in the first year was independently predictive of adult asthma (odds ratio, 10.7; 95% CI, 2.1-55.1; P = .001; sensitivity, 57%; specificity, 89%). CONCLUSION: Prediction of adult asthma remains difficult. In this study of subjects at risk of atopy, skin sensitivity to hen's egg or cow's milk in the first year was predictive of adult asthma. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11692095/Early_life_risk_factors_for_adult_asthma:_a_birth_cohort_study_of_subjects_at_risk_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -