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Conventional and ambulatory urodynamic findings in women with symptoms suggestive of bladder overactivity.
J Urol. 2001 Dec; 166(6):2253-8.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We compared ambulatory urodynamics and conventional video cystometry findings in women with symptoms of bladder overactivity.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

In a prospective randomized crossover study 106 women with symptoms of urinary urgency with or without incontinence were comprehensively investigated by video cystometry and ambulatory urodynamics in random order. In addition, all women completed a validated symptoms questionnaire and voiding diary.

RESULTS

Involuntary detrusor activity was detected in 32 and 70 cases on video cystometry and ambulatory urodynamics, respectively (p <0.001). Video cystometry done according to International Continence Society standards diagnosed detrusor instability in 4 women with no involuntary detrusor activity on ambulatory urodynamics. Involuntary detrusor activity resulting in incontinence was observed in 39 cases on ambulatory urodynamics, including 20 (51%) with stable video cystometry results. Stress incontinence was diagnosed in 42 cases on video cystometry and in 34 on ambulatory urodynamics (p = 0.629). Increasingly severe urge and stress incontinence reported in the symptoms questionnaire correlated positively with the subsequent detection of detrusor overactivity and stress incontinence, respectively, on the 2 urodynamic tests.

CONCLUSIONS

In contrast to video cystometry, ambulatory urodynamics provides objective evidence of clinically important bladder overactivity in the majority of women with symptoms suggestive of bladder overactivity. The correlation of symptoms with ambulatory urodynamic findings implies that greater reliance may be placed on symptomatic diagnosis of bladder overactivity. Improved objective assessment of detrusor function provided by ambulatory urodynamics has implications for the definition of bladder overactivity and relevance of conventional cystometry in this context. In women who complain of urgency stable conventional cystometrography findings should be interpreted with caution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11696746

Citation

Radley, S C., et al. "Conventional and Ambulatory Urodynamic Findings in Women With Symptoms Suggestive of Bladder Overactivity." The Journal of Urology, vol. 166, no. 6, 2001, pp. 2253-8.
Radley SC, Rosario DJ, Chapple CR, et al. Conventional and ambulatory urodynamic findings in women with symptoms suggestive of bladder overactivity. J Urol. 2001;166(6):2253-8.
Radley, S. C., Rosario, D. J., Chapple, C. R., & Farkas, A. G. (2001). Conventional and ambulatory urodynamic findings in women with symptoms suggestive of bladder overactivity. The Journal of Urology, 166(6), 2253-8.
Radley SC, et al. Conventional and Ambulatory Urodynamic Findings in Women With Symptoms Suggestive of Bladder Overactivity. J Urol. 2001;166(6):2253-8. PubMed PMID: 11696746.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conventional and ambulatory urodynamic findings in women with symptoms suggestive of bladder overactivity. AU - Radley,S C, AU - Rosario,D J, AU - Chapple,C R, AU - Farkas,A G, PY - 2001/11/7/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/7/entrez SP - 2253 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J Urol VL - 166 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: We compared ambulatory urodynamics and conventional video cystometry findings in women with symptoms of bladder overactivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective randomized crossover study 106 women with symptoms of urinary urgency with or without incontinence were comprehensively investigated by video cystometry and ambulatory urodynamics in random order. In addition, all women completed a validated symptoms questionnaire and voiding diary. RESULTS: Involuntary detrusor activity was detected in 32 and 70 cases on video cystometry and ambulatory urodynamics, respectively (p <0.001). Video cystometry done according to International Continence Society standards diagnosed detrusor instability in 4 women with no involuntary detrusor activity on ambulatory urodynamics. Involuntary detrusor activity resulting in incontinence was observed in 39 cases on ambulatory urodynamics, including 20 (51%) with stable video cystometry results. Stress incontinence was diagnosed in 42 cases on video cystometry and in 34 on ambulatory urodynamics (p = 0.629). Increasingly severe urge and stress incontinence reported in the symptoms questionnaire correlated positively with the subsequent detection of detrusor overactivity and stress incontinence, respectively, on the 2 urodynamic tests. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to video cystometry, ambulatory urodynamics provides objective evidence of clinically important bladder overactivity in the majority of women with symptoms suggestive of bladder overactivity. The correlation of symptoms with ambulatory urodynamic findings implies that greater reliance may be placed on symptomatic diagnosis of bladder overactivity. Improved objective assessment of detrusor function provided by ambulatory urodynamics has implications for the definition of bladder overactivity and relevance of conventional cystometry in this context. In women who complain of urgency stable conventional cystometrography findings should be interpreted with caution. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11696746/Conventional_and_ambulatory_urodynamic_findings_in_women_with_symptoms_suggestive_of_bladder_overactivity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-5347(05)65545-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -