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The evolutionary split of Pinaceae from other conifers: evidence from an intron loss and a multigene phylogeny.
Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2001 Nov; 21(2):167-75.MP

Abstract

The second intron in the mitochondrial gene nad1 was surveyed using PCR, DNA sequencing, or Southern hybridization in 323 species (313 genera, 212 families) of seed plants. The intron was absent in all 22 species (22 genera, 8 families) of non-Pinaceae conifers studied, in Welwitschia mirabilis, and in seven angiosperms. Whereas absence of the intron in seven angiosperms and Welwitschia is likely due to seven independent losses when evaluated against the recently published multigene phylogenies, the lack of the intron in all non-Pinaceae conifers can be best explained by a single loss. These data suggest that the non-Pinaceae conifers represent a monophyletic group. We also conducted a phylogenetic analysis of seed plants using a combined data set of the partial exon and intron sequences of nad1 generated from this study and published sequences of mitochondrial cox1 and small subunit (SSU) rDNA, chloroplast rbcL, and nuclear 18S rDNA. The results supported the split of conifers into two groups: Pinaceae and non-Pinaceae conifers. The Gnetales were sister to Pinaceae, in agreement with the conclusion from other recent molecular phylogenetic studies that refute the anthophyte hypothesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

WSL Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt, Zürcherstrasse 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland. gugerli@wsl.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11697913

Citation

Gugerli, F, et al. "The Evolutionary Split of Pinaceae From Other Conifers: Evidence From an Intron Loss and a Multigene Phylogeny." Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, vol. 21, no. 2, 2001, pp. 167-75.
Gugerli F, Sperisen C, Büchler U, et al. The evolutionary split of Pinaceae from other conifers: evidence from an intron loss and a multigene phylogeny. Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2001;21(2):167-75.
Gugerli, F., Sperisen, C., Büchler, U., Brunner, I., Brodbeck, S., Palmer, J. D., & Qiu, Y. L. (2001). The evolutionary split of Pinaceae from other conifers: evidence from an intron loss and a multigene phylogeny. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 21(2), 167-75.
Gugerli F, et al. The Evolutionary Split of Pinaceae From Other Conifers: Evidence From an Intron Loss and a Multigene Phylogeny. Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2001;21(2):167-75. PubMed PMID: 11697913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The evolutionary split of Pinaceae from other conifers: evidence from an intron loss and a multigene phylogeny. AU - Gugerli,F, AU - Sperisen,C, AU - Büchler,U, AU - Brunner,I, AU - Brodbeck,S, AU - Palmer,J D, AU - Qiu,Y L, PY - 2001/11/8/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/8/entrez SP - 167 EP - 75 JF - Molecular phylogenetics and evolution JO - Mol Phylogenet Evol VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - The second intron in the mitochondrial gene nad1 was surveyed using PCR, DNA sequencing, or Southern hybridization in 323 species (313 genera, 212 families) of seed plants. The intron was absent in all 22 species (22 genera, 8 families) of non-Pinaceae conifers studied, in Welwitschia mirabilis, and in seven angiosperms. Whereas absence of the intron in seven angiosperms and Welwitschia is likely due to seven independent losses when evaluated against the recently published multigene phylogenies, the lack of the intron in all non-Pinaceae conifers can be best explained by a single loss. These data suggest that the non-Pinaceae conifers represent a monophyletic group. We also conducted a phylogenetic analysis of seed plants using a combined data set of the partial exon and intron sequences of nad1 generated from this study and published sequences of mitochondrial cox1 and small subunit (SSU) rDNA, chloroplast rbcL, and nuclear 18S rDNA. The results supported the split of conifers into two groups: Pinaceae and non-Pinaceae conifers. The Gnetales were sister to Pinaceae, in agreement with the conclusion from other recent molecular phylogenetic studies that refute the anthophyte hypothesis. SN - 1055-7903 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11697913/The_evolutionary_split_of_Pinaceae_from_other_conifers:_evidence_from_an_intron_loss_and_a_multigene_phylogeny_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1055790301910048 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -