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CT and MR imaging of acquired abnormalities of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle.
Eur J Radiol. 2001 Nov; 40(2):105-12.EJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Several entities of acquired lesions may affect the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle. The imaging of these lesions depends on the clinical history, and should be adapted to the lesion searched for and suspected by the otolaryngologist. In this paper, the modality of CT and MR imaging which is suited to delineate the acquired lesions of this region will be presented.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

CT and/or MR imaging of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle was performed in all cases in which an acquired lesion of this region was suspected by the otolaryngologist. CT was performed in the axial and coronal plane with the use of a high-resolution bone-window-level-setting. MRI was performed in the axial plane using high-resolution 3D T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences and 3D T1-weighted gradient echo sequences before and after the i.v. application of gadopentate dimeglumine. The obtained images were evaluated for the depiction of the acquired lesions.

RESULTS

CT best depicted osseous lesions such as traumatic affections or lesions leading to ossification of the inner ear. Tumorous lesions were delineated in those cases in which they yielded to bony changes. Inflammatory or tumorous lesions not yielding to bony changes or intralabyrintine calicifications were not depicted. MRI delineated very well all lesions leading to soft tissue changes, and moderately depicted traumatic changes yielding to less severe fractures affecting the investigated region.

CONCLUSION

CT and MR imaging are suited differently to delineate the acquired lesions of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle. CT is excellently suited to depict osseous lesions, while MRI is excellently suited to delineate lesions affecting the soft tissue structures. These two imaging modalities should be used depending on the clinical question, and are supposed to be complementary methods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Abteilung für Osteologie/Universitätsklinik für Radiodiagnostik Wien, AKH Wien, Wahringer Gurtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11704357

Citation

Czerny, C, et al. "CT and MR Imaging of Acquired Abnormalities of the Inner Ear and Cerebellopontine Angle." European Journal of Radiology, vol. 40, no. 2, 2001, pp. 105-12.
Czerny C, Gstoettner W, Franz P, et al. CT and MR imaging of acquired abnormalities of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle. Eur J Radiol. 2001;40(2):105-12.
Czerny, C., Gstoettner, W., Franz, P., Baumgartner, W. D., & Imhof, H. (2001). CT and MR imaging of acquired abnormalities of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle. European Journal of Radiology, 40(2), 105-12.
Czerny C, et al. CT and MR Imaging of Acquired Abnormalities of the Inner Ear and Cerebellopontine Angle. Eur J Radiol. 2001;40(2):105-12. PubMed PMID: 11704357.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CT and MR imaging of acquired abnormalities of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle. AU - Czerny,C, AU - Gstoettner,W, AU - Franz,P, AU - Baumgartner,W D, AU - Imhof,H, PY - 2001/11/13/pubmed PY - 2002/1/16/medline PY - 2001/11/13/entrez SP - 105 EP - 12 JF - European journal of radiology JO - Eur J Radiol VL - 40 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Several entities of acquired lesions may affect the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle. The imaging of these lesions depends on the clinical history, and should be adapted to the lesion searched for and suspected by the otolaryngologist. In this paper, the modality of CT and MR imaging which is suited to delineate the acquired lesions of this region will be presented. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT and/or MR imaging of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle was performed in all cases in which an acquired lesion of this region was suspected by the otolaryngologist. CT was performed in the axial and coronal plane with the use of a high-resolution bone-window-level-setting. MRI was performed in the axial plane using high-resolution 3D T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences and 3D T1-weighted gradient echo sequences before and after the i.v. application of gadopentate dimeglumine. The obtained images were evaluated for the depiction of the acquired lesions. RESULTS: CT best depicted osseous lesions such as traumatic affections or lesions leading to ossification of the inner ear. Tumorous lesions were delineated in those cases in which they yielded to bony changes. Inflammatory or tumorous lesions not yielding to bony changes or intralabyrintine calicifications were not depicted. MRI delineated very well all lesions leading to soft tissue changes, and moderately depicted traumatic changes yielding to less severe fractures affecting the investigated region. CONCLUSION: CT and MR imaging are suited differently to delineate the acquired lesions of the inner ear and cerebellopontine angle. CT is excellently suited to depict osseous lesions, while MRI is excellently suited to delineate lesions affecting the soft tissue structures. These two imaging modalities should be used depending on the clinical question, and are supposed to be complementary methods. SN - 0720-048X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11704357/CT_and_MR_imaging_of_acquired_abnormalities_of_the_inner_ear_and_cerebellopontine_angle_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0720048X01003783 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -