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Reducing cardiovascular disease risk with diet.
Obes Res 2001; 9 Suppl 4:335S-340SOR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Past research efforts to determine the influence of the diet on cardiovascular (CV) health have focused on the individual roles of specific dietary components with debatable success. Awareness of the impact and complexity of nutrient interactions has expanded in recent years to include assessment of dietary patterns as they contribute to lower CV disease risk.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

In a series of multicenter studies, we compared a comprehensive, prepared meal plan, formulated to meet recommended intake levels of macro- and micronutrients, with a self-selected diet based on the exchange system. The three studies comprised adult participants with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and type 2 diabetes (n = 560, 251, and 330, respectively). The first two studies (10 weeks) varied by the amount of contact with study personnel, and the third study assessed long-term effects over 52 weeks. Outcome measures included: blood pressure, lipid and lipoprotein levels, glycemic control, homocysteine, compliance, quality of life, and weight.

RESULTS

The first study demonstrated significant improvements in all measures, with greater improvements with the prepared meal plan compared with the self-selected diet. The second study, designed to parallel the contact frequency that would occur in a real world clinical setting, also produced significant improvements in multiple CV risk factors. In the long-term study, in addition to sustained improvements in risk factors, significant weight loss was achieved and maintained over the 52 weeks.

DISCUSSION

These trials demonstrate that regular consumption of a nutritionally complete diet offers multiple, concurrent clinical benefits for reducing CV disease risk and body weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, USA. dmccarron@academicnetwork.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11707562

Citation

McCarron, D A., and M E. Reusser. "Reducing Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Diet." Obesity Research, vol. 9 Suppl 4, 2001, 335S-340S.
McCarron DA, Reusser ME. Reducing cardiovascular disease risk with diet. Obes Res. 2001;9 Suppl 4:335S-340S.
McCarron, D. A., & Reusser, M. E. (2001). Reducing cardiovascular disease risk with diet. Obesity Research, 9 Suppl 4, 335S-340S.
McCarron DA, Reusser ME. Reducing Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Diet. Obes Res. 2001;9 Suppl 4:335S-340S. PubMed PMID: 11707562.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reducing cardiovascular disease risk with diet. AU - McCarron,D A, AU - Reusser,M E, PY - 2001/11/15/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/15/entrez SP - 335S EP - 340S JF - Obesity research JO - Obes. Res. VL - 9 Suppl 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Past research efforts to determine the influence of the diet on cardiovascular (CV) health have focused on the individual roles of specific dietary components with debatable success. Awareness of the impact and complexity of nutrient interactions has expanded in recent years to include assessment of dietary patterns as they contribute to lower CV disease risk. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: In a series of multicenter studies, we compared a comprehensive, prepared meal plan, formulated to meet recommended intake levels of macro- and micronutrients, with a self-selected diet based on the exchange system. The three studies comprised adult participants with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and type 2 diabetes (n = 560, 251, and 330, respectively). The first two studies (10 weeks) varied by the amount of contact with study personnel, and the third study assessed long-term effects over 52 weeks. Outcome measures included: blood pressure, lipid and lipoprotein levels, glycemic control, homocysteine, compliance, quality of life, and weight. RESULTS: The first study demonstrated significant improvements in all measures, with greater improvements with the prepared meal plan compared with the self-selected diet. The second study, designed to parallel the contact frequency that would occur in a real world clinical setting, also produced significant improvements in multiple CV risk factors. In the long-term study, in addition to sustained improvements in risk factors, significant weight loss was achieved and maintained over the 52 weeks. DISCUSSION: These trials demonstrate that regular consumption of a nutritionally complete diet offers multiple, concurrent clinical benefits for reducing CV disease risk and body weight. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11707562/Reducing_cardiovascular_disease_risk_with_diet_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2001.139 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -