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Ainsworth revisited: an empirical analysis of interactive behavior in the home.
Attach Hum Dev. 1999 Sep; 1(2):191-216.AH

Abstract

Naturalistic assessment of maternal and infant interactive behavior using q-sorts has typically focused on rationally derived variables, such as maternal sensitivity and infant security. In the current study, behavior profiles characteristic of groups of young and adult mothers and their infants were derived empirically through q-factor analysis of the Maternal Behavior Q-sort (Version 3.0) and the Attachment Q-sort (Version 3.0). A three-factor solution best described the behavior profiles characteristic of young mothers. The identified factors were labeled: 'ignoring/neglecting versus interacting', 'accepting versus hostile/rejecting', and 'interfering'. The behavior of adult mothers was less variable and was described with only one factor, which corresponded to the 'accepting versus hostile/rejecting' factor. The factor solutions for infants of young and adult mothers were similar, with four identified factors, or behavioral profiles, discriminating between groups of infants with similar patterns of behavior: 'secure with mother', 'prefers visitor', 'socially withdrawn' and 'demanding with mother'. Infants of young and adult mothers differed with regard to their mean values on the first two identified factors. Results provide support for the relevance of rationally derived domains and criterion sorts in populations of both adult and young mothers, and suggest ways of progressing beyond the currently used, rationally derived variables in assessments of maternal and infant behavior in high- and low-risk populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5C2, Canada. hneufeld@julian.uwo.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11707888

Citation

Bailey, H N., et al. "Ainsworth Revisited: an Empirical Analysis of Interactive Behavior in the Home." Attachment & Human Development, vol. 1, no. 2, 1999, pp. 191-216.
Bailey HN, Waters CA, Pederson DR, et al. Ainsworth revisited: an empirical analysis of interactive behavior in the home. Attach Hum Dev. 1999;1(2):191-216.
Bailey, H. N., Waters, C. A., Pederson, D. R., & Moran, G. (1999). Ainsworth revisited: an empirical analysis of interactive behavior in the home. Attachment & Human Development, 1(2), 191-216.
Bailey HN, et al. Ainsworth Revisited: an Empirical Analysis of Interactive Behavior in the Home. Attach Hum Dev. 1999;1(2):191-216. PubMed PMID: 11707888.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ainsworth revisited: an empirical analysis of interactive behavior in the home. AU - Bailey,H N, AU - Waters,C A, AU - Pederson,D R, AU - Moran,G, PY - 2001/11/16/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/16/entrez SP - 191 EP - 216 JF - Attachment & human development JO - Attach Hum Dev VL - 1 IS - 2 N2 - Naturalistic assessment of maternal and infant interactive behavior using q-sorts has typically focused on rationally derived variables, such as maternal sensitivity and infant security. In the current study, behavior profiles characteristic of groups of young and adult mothers and their infants were derived empirically through q-factor analysis of the Maternal Behavior Q-sort (Version 3.0) and the Attachment Q-sort (Version 3.0). A three-factor solution best described the behavior profiles characteristic of young mothers. The identified factors were labeled: 'ignoring/neglecting versus interacting', 'accepting versus hostile/rejecting', and 'interfering'. The behavior of adult mothers was less variable and was described with only one factor, which corresponded to the 'accepting versus hostile/rejecting' factor. The factor solutions for infants of young and adult mothers were similar, with four identified factors, or behavioral profiles, discriminating between groups of infants with similar patterns of behavior: 'secure with mother', 'prefers visitor', 'socially withdrawn' and 'demanding with mother'. Infants of young and adult mothers differed with regard to their mean values on the first two identified factors. Results provide support for the relevance of rationally derived domains and criterion sorts in populations of both adult and young mothers, and suggest ways of progressing beyond the currently used, rationally derived variables in assessments of maternal and infant behavior in high- and low-risk populations. SN - 1461-6734 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11707888/Ainsworth_revisited:_an_empirical_analysis_of_interactive_behavior_in_the_home_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616739900134231 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -