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The load that maximizes the average mechanical power output during jump squats in power-trained athletes.
J Strength Cond Res. 2001 Feb; 15(1):92-7.JS

Abstract

Three studies that used rugby league players experienced in power training methods as subjects were performed to investigate the resistance (percentage of 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) that maximized the average mechanical power output (Pmax) during the jump squat exercise. Maximum strength was assessed via 1RM (studies 2 and 3) or 3RM (study 1) during the full-squat exercise. Pmax was assessed during barbell jump squats, using resistances of 40, 60, 80, and 100 kg within the Plyometric Power System. All studies found that power output was maximized by resistances averaging circa 85-95 kg, representing 55-59% of 1RM full-squat strength. However, loads in the range of 47-63% of 1RM were often similarly effective in maximizing power output. The results of this investigation suggest that athletes specifically trained via both maximal strength and power training methods may generate their maximal power outputs at higher percentages of 1RM than those previously reported for solely strength-trained athletes and that there would appear to be an effective range of resistances for maximizing power output.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Sunshine Coast University, QLD, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11708714

Citation

Baker, D, et al. "The Load That Maximizes the Average Mechanical Power Output During Jump Squats in Power-trained Athletes." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 15, no. 1, 2001, pp. 92-7.
Baker D, Nance S, Moore M. The load that maximizes the average mechanical power output during jump squats in power-trained athletes. J Strength Cond Res. 2001;15(1):92-7.
Baker, D., Nance, S., & Moore, M. (2001). The load that maximizes the average mechanical power output during jump squats in power-trained athletes. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 15(1), 92-7.
Baker D, Nance S, Moore M. The Load That Maximizes the Average Mechanical Power Output During Jump Squats in Power-trained Athletes. J Strength Cond Res. 2001;15(1):92-7. PubMed PMID: 11708714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The load that maximizes the average mechanical power output during jump squats in power-trained athletes. AU - Baker,D, AU - Nance,S, AU - Moore,M, PY - 2001/11/16/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/16/entrez SP - 92 EP - 7 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - Three studies that used rugby league players experienced in power training methods as subjects were performed to investigate the resistance (percentage of 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) that maximized the average mechanical power output (Pmax) during the jump squat exercise. Maximum strength was assessed via 1RM (studies 2 and 3) or 3RM (study 1) during the full-squat exercise. Pmax was assessed during barbell jump squats, using resistances of 40, 60, 80, and 100 kg within the Plyometric Power System. All studies found that power output was maximized by resistances averaging circa 85-95 kg, representing 55-59% of 1RM full-squat strength. However, loads in the range of 47-63% of 1RM were often similarly effective in maximizing power output. The results of this investigation suggest that athletes specifically trained via both maximal strength and power training methods may generate their maximal power outputs at higher percentages of 1RM than those previously reported for solely strength-trained athletes and that there would appear to be an effective range of resistances for maximizing power output. SN - 1064-8011 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11708714/The_load_that_maximizes_the_average_mechanical_power_output_during_jump_squats_in_power_trained_athletes_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=11708714.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -