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[Fat consumption and breast cancer: preliminary results from the E3N-Epic cohort].
Bull Cancer 2001; 88(10):954-8BC

Abstract

Recent reviews have concluded that a high consumption of total, saturated or animal, fat could possibly increase the risk of breast cancer. However these results are highly dependent on the type of study; indeed, most of the prospective studies do not support this association. In this paper, we investigated the relationship between fat consumption and breast cancer risk in the E3N-Epic cohort, the French component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Assessment of fat consumption was based on daily intakes of food items and nutrients using a food-frequency questionnaire. Relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using Cox's proportional hazards model. After an average of 3.4 years of follow-up, 838 cases of incident breast cancer were recorded in a study population of 65,879 women. The mean caloric intake was 2,073 kcal (SD 540), with 37% of calories coming from fat intake. Milk products and vegetable oils were the main sources of fat in the diet. We found a small positive association between fat intake and breast cancer risk. Compared with the lowest, women in the highest quartile of fat intake had a 37% higher risk of breast cancer (RR 1.37, CI95% = 0.99-1.89). There was no detectable association between fatty acids or food items contributing to fat intake and breast cancer risk. These analyses suggest there is a need for longer follow-up time to increase statistical power and confirm these tendencies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Inserm U. 521, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39, rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

fre

PubMed ID

11713032

Citation

Thiébaut, A C., and F Clavel-Chapelon. "[Fat Consumption and Breast Cancer: Preliminary Results From the E3N-Epic Cohort]." Bulletin Du Cancer, vol. 88, no. 10, 2001, pp. 954-8.
Thiébaut AC, Clavel-Chapelon F. [Fat consumption and breast cancer: preliminary results from the E3N-Epic cohort]. Bull Cancer. 2001;88(10):954-8.
Thiébaut, A. C., & Clavel-Chapelon, F. (2001). [Fat consumption and breast cancer: preliminary results from the E3N-Epic cohort]. Bulletin Du Cancer, 88(10), pp. 954-8.
Thiébaut AC, Clavel-Chapelon F. [Fat Consumption and Breast Cancer: Preliminary Results From the E3N-Epic Cohort]. Bull Cancer. 2001;88(10):954-8. PubMed PMID: 11713032.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Fat consumption and breast cancer: preliminary results from the E3N-Epic cohort]. AU - Thiébaut,A C, AU - Clavel-Chapelon,F, PY - 2001/11/20/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/20/entrez SP - 954 EP - 8 JF - Bulletin du cancer JO - Bull Cancer VL - 88 IS - 10 N2 - Recent reviews have concluded that a high consumption of total, saturated or animal, fat could possibly increase the risk of breast cancer. However these results are highly dependent on the type of study; indeed, most of the prospective studies do not support this association. In this paper, we investigated the relationship between fat consumption and breast cancer risk in the E3N-Epic cohort, the French component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Assessment of fat consumption was based on daily intakes of food items and nutrients using a food-frequency questionnaire. Relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using Cox's proportional hazards model. After an average of 3.4 years of follow-up, 838 cases of incident breast cancer were recorded in a study population of 65,879 women. The mean caloric intake was 2,073 kcal (SD 540), with 37% of calories coming from fat intake. Milk products and vegetable oils were the main sources of fat in the diet. We found a small positive association between fat intake and breast cancer risk. Compared with the lowest, women in the highest quartile of fat intake had a 37% higher risk of breast cancer (RR 1.37, CI95% = 0.99-1.89). There was no detectable association between fatty acids or food items contributing to fat intake and breast cancer risk. These analyses suggest there is a need for longer follow-up time to increase statistical power and confirm these tendencies. SN - 0007-4551 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11713032/[Fat_consumption_and_breast_cancer:_preliminary_results_from_the_E3N_Epic_cohort]_ L2 - http://www.jle.com/medline.md?issn=0007-4551&vol=88&iss=10&page=954 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -