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Apparent copper absorption from a vegetarian diet.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Dec; 74(6):803-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Vegetarian diets often contain more copper than do nonvegetarian diets, but observations of decreased plasma copper associated with vegetarian diets suggest that these diets have lower copper bioavailability than do nonvegetarian diets.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to determine apparent copper absorption from controlled lactoovovegetarian and nonvegetarian diets.

DESIGN

Eighteen women aged 20-43 y consumed lactoovovegetarian and nonvegetarian weighed diets for 8 wk each in a randomized, crossover design. The lactoovovegetarian and nonvegetarian diets provided 1.45 and 0.94 mg Cu, 38 and 16 g dietary fiber, and 1584 and 518 mg phytic acid, respectively, per 9.2 MJ (2200 kcal). After the women had been consuming each diet for 4 wk, their apparent copper absorption was determined by measuring the fecal excretion of the 65Cu stable isotope, extrinsically added to the entire menu as 65CuCl2.

RESULTS

Plasma copper and ceruloplasmin were not affected by diet. The efficiency of apparent copper absorption from the lactoovovegetarian diet was less (33%) than that from the nonvegetarian diet (42%) (pooled SD: 9%; P < 0.05). However, because the lactoovovegetarian diet contained approximately 50% more copper, the total apparent copper absorption from the lactoovovegetarian diet (0.48 mg/d) was greater than that from the nonvegetarian diet (0.40 mg/d) (pooled SD: 0.09 mg; P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Although copper was less efficiently absorbed from a vegetarian diet than from a nonvegetarian diet, total apparent copper absorption was greater from the vegetarian diet because of its greater copper content.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, ND, USA. jhunt@gfhnrc.ars.usda.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11722963

Citation

Hunt, J R., and R A. Vanderpool. "Apparent Copper Absorption From a Vegetarian Diet." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 74, no. 6, 2001, pp. 803-7.
Hunt JR, Vanderpool RA. Apparent copper absorption from a vegetarian diet. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;74(6):803-7.
Hunt, J. R., & Vanderpool, R. A. (2001). Apparent copper absorption from a vegetarian diet. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 74(6), 803-7.
Hunt JR, Vanderpool RA. Apparent Copper Absorption From a Vegetarian Diet. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;74(6):803-7. PubMed PMID: 11722963.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Apparent copper absorption from a vegetarian diet. AU - Hunt,J R, AU - Vanderpool,R A, PY - 2001/11/28/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/11/28/entrez SP - 803 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 74 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Vegetarian diets often contain more copper than do nonvegetarian diets, but observations of decreased plasma copper associated with vegetarian diets suggest that these diets have lower copper bioavailability than do nonvegetarian diets. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine apparent copper absorption from controlled lactoovovegetarian and nonvegetarian diets. DESIGN: Eighteen women aged 20-43 y consumed lactoovovegetarian and nonvegetarian weighed diets for 8 wk each in a randomized, crossover design. The lactoovovegetarian and nonvegetarian diets provided 1.45 and 0.94 mg Cu, 38 and 16 g dietary fiber, and 1584 and 518 mg phytic acid, respectively, per 9.2 MJ (2200 kcal). After the women had been consuming each diet for 4 wk, their apparent copper absorption was determined by measuring the fecal excretion of the 65Cu stable isotope, extrinsically added to the entire menu as 65CuCl2. RESULTS: Plasma copper and ceruloplasmin were not affected by diet. The efficiency of apparent copper absorption from the lactoovovegetarian diet was less (33%) than that from the nonvegetarian diet (42%) (pooled SD: 9%; P < 0.05). However, because the lactoovovegetarian diet contained approximately 50% more copper, the total apparent copper absorption from the lactoovovegetarian diet (0.48 mg/d) was greater than that from the nonvegetarian diet (0.40 mg/d) (pooled SD: 0.09 mg; P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Although copper was less efficiently absorbed from a vegetarian diet than from a nonvegetarian diet, total apparent copper absorption was greater from the vegetarian diet because of its greater copper content. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11722963/Apparent_copper_absorption_from_a_vegetarian_diet_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/74.6.803 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -