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Malaria control in Bungoma District, Kenya: a survey of home treatment of children with fever, bednet use and attendance at antenatal clinics.
Bull World Health Organ. 2001; 79(11):1014-23.BW

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To lay the basis for planning an improved malaria control programme in Bungoma District, Kenya.

METHODS

By means of a cluster sample household survey an investigation was conducted into the home management of febrile children, the use of bednets, and attendance at antenatal clinics.

FINDINGS

Female carers provided information on 314 recently febrile children under 5 years of age, of whom 43% received care at a health facility, 47% received an antimalarial drug at home, and 25% received neither. Of the antimalarial treatments given at home, 91% were started by the second day of fever and 92% were with chloroquine, the nationally recommended antimalarial at the time. The recommended dosage of chloroquine to be administered over three days was 25 mg/kg but the median chloroquine tablet or syrup dosage given over the first three days of treatment was 15 mg/kg. The total dosages ranged from 2.5 mg/kg to 82 mg/kg, administered over one to five days. The dosages were lower when syrup was administered than when tablets were used. Only 5% of children under 5 years of age slept under a bednet. No bednets had been treated with insecticide since purchase. At least two antenatal visits were made by 91% of pregnant women.

CONCLUSIONS

Carers are major and prompt providers of antimalarial treatment. Home treatment practices should be strengthened and endorsed when prompt treatment at a health facility is impossible. The administration of incorrect dosages, which proved common with chloroquine, may occur less frequently with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, as its dosage regimen is simpler. High levels of utilization of antenatal clinics afford the opportunity to achieve good coverage with presumptive intermittent malaria treatments during pregnancy, and to reach the goal of widespread bednet use by pregnant women and children by distributing nets during antenatal clinic visits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11731808

Citation

Hamel, M J., et al. "Malaria Control in Bungoma District, Kenya: a Survey of Home Treatment of Children With Fever, Bednet Use and Attendance at Antenatal Clinics." Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 79, no. 11, 2001, pp. 1014-23.
Hamel MJ, Odhacha A, Roberts JM, et al. Malaria control in Bungoma District, Kenya: a survey of home treatment of children with fever, bednet use and attendance at antenatal clinics. Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(11):1014-23.
Hamel, M. J., Odhacha, A., Roberts, J. M., & Deming, M. S. (2001). Malaria control in Bungoma District, Kenya: a survey of home treatment of children with fever, bednet use and attendance at antenatal clinics. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 79(11), 1014-23.
Hamel MJ, et al. Malaria Control in Bungoma District, Kenya: a Survey of Home Treatment of Children With Fever, Bednet Use and Attendance at Antenatal Clinics. Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(11):1014-23. PubMed PMID: 11731808.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malaria control in Bungoma District, Kenya: a survey of home treatment of children with fever, bednet use and attendance at antenatal clinics. AU - Hamel,M J, AU - Odhacha,A, AU - Roberts,J M, AU - Deming,M S, PY - 2001/12/4/pubmed PY - 2002/1/10/medline PY - 2001/12/4/entrez SP - 1014 EP - 23 JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization JO - Bull World Health Organ VL - 79 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To lay the basis for planning an improved malaria control programme in Bungoma District, Kenya. METHODS: By means of a cluster sample household survey an investigation was conducted into the home management of febrile children, the use of bednets, and attendance at antenatal clinics. FINDINGS: Female carers provided information on 314 recently febrile children under 5 years of age, of whom 43% received care at a health facility, 47% received an antimalarial drug at home, and 25% received neither. Of the antimalarial treatments given at home, 91% were started by the second day of fever and 92% were with chloroquine, the nationally recommended antimalarial at the time. The recommended dosage of chloroquine to be administered over three days was 25 mg/kg but the median chloroquine tablet or syrup dosage given over the first three days of treatment was 15 mg/kg. The total dosages ranged from 2.5 mg/kg to 82 mg/kg, administered over one to five days. The dosages were lower when syrup was administered than when tablets were used. Only 5% of children under 5 years of age slept under a bednet. No bednets had been treated with insecticide since purchase. At least two antenatal visits were made by 91% of pregnant women. CONCLUSIONS: Carers are major and prompt providers of antimalarial treatment. Home treatment practices should be strengthened and endorsed when prompt treatment at a health facility is impossible. The administration of incorrect dosages, which proved common with chloroquine, may occur less frequently with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, as its dosage regimen is simpler. High levels of utilization of antenatal clinics afford the opportunity to achieve good coverage with presumptive intermittent malaria treatments during pregnancy, and to reach the goal of widespread bednet use by pregnant women and children by distributing nets during antenatal clinic visits. SN - 0042-9686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11731808/Malaria_control_in_Bungoma_District_Kenya:_a_survey_of_home_treatment_of_children_with_fever_bednet_use_and_attendance_at_antenatal_clinics_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/11731808/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -