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Meningococcal disease and travel.
Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Jan 01; 34(1):84-90.CI

Abstract

Invasive meningococcal disease, in both endemic and epidemic forms, is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite all advances in therapy, the fatality rate of meningococcal meningitis remains unacceptably high, between 5% and 10%, and a similar proportion suffers long-term neurological sequalae. Prevention of this rapidly fatal disease is of paramount importance. The use of the available internationally licensed meningococcal vaccines would be indicated for individuals with medical conditions that increase the risk of the disease and for travelers to high-risk countries. In the last 2 years, there has been a shift in the epidemic pattern of meningococcal disease during the Hajj (pilgrimage) season, with predominance of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W135. Recent changes have been made in the policy issued by the Saudi Ministry of Health (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia), which requires visitors from all over the world arriving for purposes of umra and Hajj to show evidence of vaccination against meningitis with the quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Infection Prevention and Control Program, National Guard Health Affairs, King Fahad National Guard Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Memish@ngha.med.sa

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11731951

Citation

Memish, Ziad A.. "Meningococcal Disease and Travel." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 34, no. 1, 2002, pp. 84-90.
Memish ZA. Meningococcal disease and travel. Clin Infect Dis. 2002;34(1):84-90.
Memish, Z. A. (2002). Meningococcal disease and travel. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 34(1), 84-90.
Memish ZA. Meningococcal Disease and Travel. Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Jan 1;34(1):84-90. PubMed PMID: 11731951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meningococcal disease and travel. A1 - Memish,Ziad A, Y1 - 2001/11/20/ PY - 2001/04/09/received PY - 2001/06/18/revised PY - 2001/12/4/pubmed PY - 2002/2/23/medline PY - 2001/12/4/entrez SP - 84 EP - 90 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 34 IS - 1 N2 - Invasive meningococcal disease, in both endemic and epidemic forms, is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite all advances in therapy, the fatality rate of meningococcal meningitis remains unacceptably high, between 5% and 10%, and a similar proportion suffers long-term neurological sequalae. Prevention of this rapidly fatal disease is of paramount importance. The use of the available internationally licensed meningococcal vaccines would be indicated for individuals with medical conditions that increase the risk of the disease and for travelers to high-risk countries. In the last 2 years, there has been a shift in the epidemic pattern of meningococcal disease during the Hajj (pilgrimage) season, with predominance of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W135. Recent changes have been made in the policy issued by the Saudi Ministry of Health (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia), which requires visitors from all over the world arriving for purposes of umra and Hajj to show evidence of vaccination against meningitis with the quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11731951/Meningococcal_disease_and_travel_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/323403 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -