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The effects of stress management on symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, secretory immunoglobulin A, and mood in young adults.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the efficacy of a stress management programme on symptoms of colds and influenza in 27 university students before and after the examination period.

METHOD

The incidence of symptoms, levels of negative affect, and secretion rate of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) were recorded for 5 weeks before treatment, for the 4 weeks of treatment, and for 8 weeks after treatment in treated subjects and in 25 others who did not participate in stress management.

RESULTS

Symptoms decreased in treated subjects but not in controls during and after the examination period. Although sIgA secretion rate increased significantly after individual sessions of relaxation, resting secretion rate of sIgA did not increase over the course of the study. Negative affect decreased after examinations in both groups, but was not affected by treatment.

CONCLUSION

Stress management reduced days of illness independently of negative affect and sIgA secretion rate. Although the component of treatment responsible for this effect has yet to be identified, psychological interventions may have a role in reducing symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School of Psychology, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia 6150, Australia.

    ,

    Source

    Journal of psychosomatic research 51:6 2001 Dec pg 721-8

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Affect
    Arousal
    Female
    Humans
    Immunoglobulin A, Secretory
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Recurrence
    Relaxation Therapy
    Respiratory Tract Infections
    Stress, Psychological
    Students
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11750294

    Citation

    Reid, M R., et al. "The Effects of Stress Management On Symptoms of Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Secretory Immunoglobulin A, and Mood in Young Adults." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 51, no. 6, 2001, pp. 721-8.
    Reid MR, Mackinnon LT, Drummond PD. The effects of stress management on symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, secretory immunoglobulin A, and mood in young adults. J Psychosom Res. 2001;51(6):721-8.
    Reid, M. R., Mackinnon, L. T., & Drummond, P. D. (2001). The effects of stress management on symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, secretory immunoglobulin A, and mood in young adults. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 51(6), pp. 721-8.
    Reid MR, Mackinnon LT, Drummond PD. The Effects of Stress Management On Symptoms of Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Secretory Immunoglobulin A, and Mood in Young Adults. J Psychosom Res. 2001;51(6):721-8. PubMed PMID: 11750294.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of stress management on symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, secretory immunoglobulin A, and mood in young adults. AU - Reid,M R, AU - Mackinnon,L T, AU - Drummond,P D, PY - 2001/12/26/pubmed PY - 2002/3/19/medline PY - 2001/12/26/entrez SP - 721 EP - 8 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 51 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of a stress management programme on symptoms of colds and influenza in 27 university students before and after the examination period. METHOD: The incidence of symptoms, levels of negative affect, and secretion rate of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) were recorded for 5 weeks before treatment, for the 4 weeks of treatment, and for 8 weeks after treatment in treated subjects and in 25 others who did not participate in stress management. RESULTS: Symptoms decreased in treated subjects but not in controls during and after the examination period. Although sIgA secretion rate increased significantly after individual sessions of relaxation, resting secretion rate of sIgA did not increase over the course of the study. Negative affect decreased after examinations in both groups, but was not affected by treatment. CONCLUSION: Stress management reduced days of illness independently of negative affect and sIgA secretion rate. Although the component of treatment responsible for this effect has yet to be identified, psychological interventions may have a role in reducing symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection. SN - 0022-3999 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11750294/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022399901002343 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -