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A prospective study of major dietary patterns and the risk of breast cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Dec; 10(12):1281-5.CE

Abstract

Our aim was to study the broader eating patterns that potentially reflect many dietary exposures working together in their association with breast cancer risk. Using data from a prospective study of 61,463 women with an average follow-up of 9.6 years and 1,328 incident cases of breast cancer, we conducted a factor analysis to identify major dietary patterns. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios. We found no association between the "Western" dietary pattern (characterized by such foods as red and processed meats, refined grains, fat, and sweets) or the "healthy" dietary pattern (fruit and vegetables, fish and poultry, low-fat dairy, and whole grains) and breast cancer risk. However, women who were in the highest category of the "drinker" dietary pattern (wine, beer, and spirits) had a moderately increased risk (rate ratio = 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.52; P for trend, 0.002). The positive association was somewhat weaker among women below 50 years of age, a finding not inconsistent with chance. Our results are in agreement with the majority of previous studies that show alcohol consumption moderately increases the risk of breast cancer, but our results do not support any association between breast cancer risk and the "Western" or "healthy" dietary patterns.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. paul.terry@mep.ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11751446

Citation

Terry, P, et al. "A Prospective Study of Major Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Breast Cancer." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 10, no. 12, 2001, pp. 1281-5.
Terry P, Suzuki R, Hu FB, et al. A prospective study of major dietary patterns and the risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001;10(12):1281-5.
Terry, P., Suzuki, R., Hu, F. B., & Wolk, A. (2001). A prospective study of major dietary patterns and the risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 10(12), 1281-5.
Terry P, et al. A Prospective Study of Major Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Breast Cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001;10(12):1281-5. PubMed PMID: 11751446.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of major dietary patterns and the risk of breast cancer. AU - Terry,P, AU - Suzuki,R, AU - Hu,F B, AU - Wolk,A, PY - 2001/12/26/pubmed PY - 2002/1/18/medline PY - 2001/12/26/entrez SP - 1281 EP - 5 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 10 IS - 12 N2 - Our aim was to study the broader eating patterns that potentially reflect many dietary exposures working together in their association with breast cancer risk. Using data from a prospective study of 61,463 women with an average follow-up of 9.6 years and 1,328 incident cases of breast cancer, we conducted a factor analysis to identify major dietary patterns. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios. We found no association between the "Western" dietary pattern (characterized by such foods as red and processed meats, refined grains, fat, and sweets) or the "healthy" dietary pattern (fruit and vegetables, fish and poultry, low-fat dairy, and whole grains) and breast cancer risk. However, women who were in the highest category of the "drinker" dietary pattern (wine, beer, and spirits) had a moderately increased risk (rate ratio = 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.52; P for trend, 0.002). The positive association was somewhat weaker among women below 50 years of age, a finding not inconsistent with chance. Our results are in agreement with the majority of previous studies that show alcohol consumption moderately increases the risk of breast cancer, but our results do not support any association between breast cancer risk and the "Western" or "healthy" dietary patterns. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11751446/A_prospective_study_of_major_dietary_patterns_and_the_risk_of_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11751446 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -