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Nutritional supplements used in weight-reduction programs increase intestinal gas in persons who malabsorb lactose.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2001 Dec; 101(12):1447-52.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine if ingestion of 2 doses of milk-based dietary supplements produce gaseous symptoms in subjects who malabsorb lactose.

DESIGN

Randomized, controlled, crossover trial.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Ten community-based subjects who malabsorb lactose.

INTERVENTION

Ingestion of 2 standard servings of milk-based supplements (a powder reconstituted in fat-free milk or a ready-to-drink preparation) or low-lactose control preparations.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Frequency of flatus passage and subjective impression of bloating, flatulence, and abdominal discomfort.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

RESULTS

The high lactose content (27 g) of 2 servings of the powder-based supplement ingested without other food resulted in a marked increase in daily flatus passages from the basal level of 9.7+/-8.2 to 30+/-14 (mean+/-SD), and a significant increase in the subjects' perception of gas. In contrast, the lower lactose content (18.4 g) of 2 servings of a ready-to-drink supplement resulted in a flatus frequency of 17+/-10 (P=.14 vs baseline) and no significant increase in the perception of increased gas. Neither supplement resulted in a significant increase in bloating, abdominal pain, or diarrhea. The lactose content of the liquid supplement was reduced by 80% following overnight incubation with an over-the-counter lactase preparation.

APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS

Persons who malabsorb lactose should be aware that sizable increases in rectal gas commonly occur when milk-based powders reconstituted in milk are used as meal replacements. In contrast, gas problems probably will be minor following ingestion of 2 doses of a ready-to-drink, milk-based supplement. The lactose content of these supplements can be markedly reduced by overnight incubation with over-the-counter lactase preparations, and this manipulation should be beneficial for subjects troubled by the increased gas caused by the consumption of lactose-containing supplements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ross Products Division, Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11762740

Citation

Suarez, F L., et al. "Nutritional Supplements Used in Weight-reduction Programs Increase Intestinal Gas in Persons Who Malabsorb Lactose." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 101, no. 12, 2001, pp. 1447-52.
Suarez FL, Zumarraga LM, Furne JK, et al. Nutritional supplements used in weight-reduction programs increase intestinal gas in persons who malabsorb lactose. J Am Diet Assoc. 2001;101(12):1447-52.
Suarez, F. L., Zumarraga, L. M., Furne, J. K., & Levitt, M. D. (2001). Nutritional supplements used in weight-reduction programs increase intestinal gas in persons who malabsorb lactose. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 101(12), 1447-52.
Suarez FL, et al. Nutritional Supplements Used in Weight-reduction Programs Increase Intestinal Gas in Persons Who Malabsorb Lactose. J Am Diet Assoc. 2001;101(12):1447-52. PubMed PMID: 11762740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutritional supplements used in weight-reduction programs increase intestinal gas in persons who malabsorb lactose. AU - Suarez,F L, AU - Zumarraga,L M, AU - Furne,J K, AU - Levitt,M D, PY - 2002/1/5/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2002/1/5/entrez SP - 1447 EP - 52 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 101 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine if ingestion of 2 doses of milk-based dietary supplements produce gaseous symptoms in subjects who malabsorb lactose. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, crossover trial. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Ten community-based subjects who malabsorb lactose. INTERVENTION: Ingestion of 2 standard servings of milk-based supplements (a powder reconstituted in fat-free milk or a ready-to-drink preparation) or low-lactose control preparations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of flatus passage and subjective impression of bloating, flatulence, and abdominal discomfort. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Wilcoxon signed-rank test. RESULTS: The high lactose content (27 g) of 2 servings of the powder-based supplement ingested without other food resulted in a marked increase in daily flatus passages from the basal level of 9.7+/-8.2 to 30+/-14 (mean+/-SD), and a significant increase in the subjects' perception of gas. In contrast, the lower lactose content (18.4 g) of 2 servings of a ready-to-drink supplement resulted in a flatus frequency of 17+/-10 (P=.14 vs baseline) and no significant increase in the perception of increased gas. Neither supplement resulted in a significant increase in bloating, abdominal pain, or diarrhea. The lactose content of the liquid supplement was reduced by 80% following overnight incubation with an over-the-counter lactase preparation. APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: Persons who malabsorb lactose should be aware that sizable increases in rectal gas commonly occur when milk-based powders reconstituted in milk are used as meal replacements. In contrast, gas problems probably will be minor following ingestion of 2 doses of a ready-to-drink, milk-based supplement. The lactose content of these supplements can be markedly reduced by overnight incubation with over-the-counter lactase preparations, and this manipulation should be beneficial for subjects troubled by the increased gas caused by the consumption of lactose-containing supplements. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11762740/Nutritional_supplements_used_in_weight_reduction_programs_increase_intestinal_gas_in_persons_who_malabsorb_lactose_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(01)00349-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -