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Estimated blood alcohol levels reached by "binge" and "nonbinge" drinkers: a survey of young adults in Montana.
Psychol Addict Behav. 2001 Dec; 15(4):317-20.PA

Abstract

The authors examined estimated blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) reached by so-called "binge drinkers" and "nonbinge drinkers" using a survey of young adults (age 18-24 years) in Montana. One third of drinkers were classified as "binge drinkers" the last time they consumed alcohol, using a gender-specific definition commonly applied to young adults: for men, having 5 or more drinks in a row, and for women, having 4 or more drinks. BAC levels were estimated on the basis of length of drinking episode, gender, weight, and typical alcohol consumption level. Among "binge drinkers," 63% did not reach .10% BAC or higher, 48% did not reach .08% BAC or higher, and 30% did not reach .06% BAC or higher. Of the "nonbinge drinkers," 7% reached .06% BAC or higher and 4% reached .08% BAC or higher. These findings underscore the potential problem of using binge drinking as a description and shorthand measure of drinking to intoxication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Montana State University, Geneva, New York 14456, USA. perkins@hws.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11767263

Citation

Perkins, H W., et al. "Estimated Blood Alcohol Levels Reached By "binge" and "nonbinge" Drinkers: a Survey of Young Adults in Montana." Psychology of Addictive Behaviors : Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 15, no. 4, 2001, pp. 317-20.
Perkins HW, Linkenbach J, Dejong W. Estimated blood alcohol levels reached by "binge" and "nonbinge" drinkers: a survey of young adults in Montana. Psychol Addict Behav. 2001;15(4):317-20.
Perkins, H. W., Linkenbach, J., & Dejong, W. (2001). Estimated blood alcohol levels reached by "binge" and "nonbinge" drinkers: a survey of young adults in Montana. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors : Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, 15(4), 317-20.
Perkins HW, Linkenbach J, Dejong W. Estimated Blood Alcohol Levels Reached By "binge" and "nonbinge" Drinkers: a Survey of Young Adults in Montana. Psychol Addict Behav. 2001;15(4):317-20. PubMed PMID: 11767263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Estimated blood alcohol levels reached by "binge" and "nonbinge" drinkers: a survey of young adults in Montana. AU - Perkins,H W, AU - Linkenbach,J, AU - Dejong,W, PY - 2002/1/5/pubmed PY - 2002/1/19/medline PY - 2002/1/5/entrez SP - 317 EP - 20 JF - Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors JO - Psychol Addict Behav VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - The authors examined estimated blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) reached by so-called "binge drinkers" and "nonbinge drinkers" using a survey of young adults (age 18-24 years) in Montana. One third of drinkers were classified as "binge drinkers" the last time they consumed alcohol, using a gender-specific definition commonly applied to young adults: for men, having 5 or more drinks in a row, and for women, having 4 or more drinks. BAC levels were estimated on the basis of length of drinking episode, gender, weight, and typical alcohol consumption level. Among "binge drinkers," 63% did not reach .10% BAC or higher, 48% did not reach .08% BAC or higher, and 30% did not reach .06% BAC or higher. Of the "nonbinge drinkers," 7% reached .06% BAC or higher and 4% reached .08% BAC or higher. These findings underscore the potential problem of using binge drinking as a description and shorthand measure of drinking to intoxication. SN - 0893-164X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11767263/Estimated_blood_alcohol_levels_reached_by_"binge"_and_"nonbinge"_drinkers:_a_survey_of_young_adults_in_Montana_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/adb/15/4/317 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -