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Attachment classifications among 18-month-old children of adolescent mothers.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002 Jan; 156(1):20-6.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine (1) patterns of secure vs insecure attachment relationships in infants of adolescent and nonadolescent mothers and (2) if these patterns are mediated by parenting characteristics, including depression, self-esteem, parenting stress, child abuse potential, psychological distress, rating of infant temperament, and the caregiving environment.

PARTICIPANTS

Fifty-one adolescent mothers and their 18-month-old infants were compared with 76 nonadolescent mothers and their 18-month-old infants.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Infant attachment classifications were assessed via the Ainsworth Strange Situation. Maternal and infant characteristics were obtained through self-report measures.

RESULTS

There were no differences in attachment classification between infants of adolescent mothers and nonadolescent mothers. Secure attachment classification was found in 67% of the infants of adolescent mothers and 62% of the infants of nonadolescent mothers. There were significant differences in the self-reported maternal characteristics. Adolescent mothers reported lower self-esteem (P<.05), more parenting stress (P<.05), more child abuse potential (P<.05), and provided a lower quality of home environment (P<.05) than nonadolescent mothers. Adolescent mothers also rated their infants as having a higher activity level (P<.05) than infants born to nonadolescent mothers. In multivariate analysis, none of these variables or social classes were found to affect attachment classification.

CONCLUSIONS

Infants of adolescent and nonadolescent mothers show similar patterns of attachment. Adolescent and nonadolescent mothers show substantial differences in parenting characteristics and in how they rate their infants' temperaments. However, these differences do not seem to impair the infant-mother attachment relationship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Infant Development Center, Women and Infants' Hospital, 101 Dudley St, Providence, RI 02905-2499, USA. landreozzi@lifespan.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11772186

Citation

Andreozzi, Lynne, et al. "Attachment Classifications Among 18-month-old Children of Adolescent Mothers." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 156, no. 1, 2002, pp. 20-6.
Andreozzi L, Flanagan P, Seifer R, et al. Attachment classifications among 18-month-old children of adolescent mothers. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156(1):20-6.
Andreozzi, L., Flanagan, P., Seifer, R., Brunner, S., & Lester, B. (2002). Attachment classifications among 18-month-old children of adolescent mothers. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 156(1), 20-6.
Andreozzi L, et al. Attachment Classifications Among 18-month-old Children of Adolescent Mothers. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156(1):20-6. PubMed PMID: 11772186.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attachment classifications among 18-month-old children of adolescent mothers. AU - Andreozzi,Lynne, AU - Flanagan,Patricia, AU - Seifer,Ronald, AU - Brunner,Susan, AU - Lester,Barry, PY - 2002/1/12/pubmed PY - 2002/1/26/medline PY - 2002/1/12/entrez SP - 20 EP - 6 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 156 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine (1) patterns of secure vs insecure attachment relationships in infants of adolescent and nonadolescent mothers and (2) if these patterns are mediated by parenting characteristics, including depression, self-esteem, parenting stress, child abuse potential, psychological distress, rating of infant temperament, and the caregiving environment. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-one adolescent mothers and their 18-month-old infants were compared with 76 nonadolescent mothers and their 18-month-old infants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Infant attachment classifications were assessed via the Ainsworth Strange Situation. Maternal and infant characteristics were obtained through self-report measures. RESULTS: There were no differences in attachment classification between infants of adolescent mothers and nonadolescent mothers. Secure attachment classification was found in 67% of the infants of adolescent mothers and 62% of the infants of nonadolescent mothers. There were significant differences in the self-reported maternal characteristics. Adolescent mothers reported lower self-esteem (P<.05), more parenting stress (P<.05), more child abuse potential (P<.05), and provided a lower quality of home environment (P<.05) than nonadolescent mothers. Adolescent mothers also rated their infants as having a higher activity level (P<.05) than infants born to nonadolescent mothers. In multivariate analysis, none of these variables or social classes were found to affect attachment classification. CONCLUSIONS: Infants of adolescent and nonadolescent mothers show similar patterns of attachment. Adolescent and nonadolescent mothers show substantial differences in parenting characteristics and in how they rate their infants' temperaments. However, these differences do not seem to impair the infant-mother attachment relationship. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11772186/Attachment_classifications_among_18_month_old_children_of_adolescent_mothers_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/vol/156/pg/20 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -