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Non-primary care physicians and smoking cessation counseling: Women Physicians' Health Study.
Women Health. 2001; 34(4):15-29.WH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The Women Physicians' Health Study (WPHS) offers a unique opportunity to examine the counseling and screening practices of women physicians in various specialties. In this study we describe the prevalence of self-reported counseling on smoking cessation among non-primary care women physicians and examine the association between their demographic, professional, and personal characteristics and such counseling on smoking cessation.

METHODS

Conducted in 1993-1994, WPHS is a nationally representative cross-sectional mailed survey of U.S. women physicians with 4,501 respondents representing all major specialties. Physicians in 9 specialty areas were grouped in 6 categories: (1) anesthesiology; (2) general surgery and surgical subspecialties; (3) emergency medicine; (4) medical subspecialties; (5) psychiatry; and (6) other. Frequent counseling was defined as having counseled patients who were known smokers at every visit or at least once a year.

RESULTS

Overall, 45% of the physicians frequently counseled smokers to quit. Medical subspecialists (80%) were most likely and psychiatrists (29%) least likely to counsel frequently. Specialty, perceived relevance of counseling to the physician's practice, and self-confidence in counseling about smoking cessation were associated with frequent counseling.

CONCLUSION

Cessation counseling by non-primary care physicians can reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. Increasing perceived relevance and self-confidence among this group of physicians, combined with implementation of system changes and the creation of physician accountability can facilitate the provision of such counseling.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. ace7@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11785855

Citation

Easton, A, et al. "Non-primary Care Physicians and Smoking Cessation Counseling: Women Physicians' Health Study." Women & Health, vol. 34, no. 4, 2001, pp. 15-29.
Easton A, Husten C, Elon L, et al. Non-primary care physicians and smoking cessation counseling: Women Physicians' Health Study. Women Health. 2001;34(4):15-29.
Easton, A., Husten, C., Elon, L., Pederson, L., & Frank, E. (2001). Non-primary care physicians and smoking cessation counseling: Women Physicians' Health Study. Women & Health, 34(4), 15-29.
Easton A, et al. Non-primary Care Physicians and Smoking Cessation Counseling: Women Physicians' Health Study. Women Health. 2001;34(4):15-29. PubMed PMID: 11785855.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-primary care physicians and smoking cessation counseling: Women Physicians' Health Study. AU - Easton,A, AU - Husten,C, AU - Elon,L, AU - Pederson,L, AU - Frank,E, PY - 2002/1/12/pubmed PY - 2002/2/21/medline PY - 2002/1/12/entrez SP - 15 EP - 29 JF - Women & health JO - Women Health VL - 34 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The Women Physicians' Health Study (WPHS) offers a unique opportunity to examine the counseling and screening practices of women physicians in various specialties. In this study we describe the prevalence of self-reported counseling on smoking cessation among non-primary care women physicians and examine the association between their demographic, professional, and personal characteristics and such counseling on smoking cessation. METHODS: Conducted in 1993-1994, WPHS is a nationally representative cross-sectional mailed survey of U.S. women physicians with 4,501 respondents representing all major specialties. Physicians in 9 specialty areas were grouped in 6 categories: (1) anesthesiology; (2) general surgery and surgical subspecialties; (3) emergency medicine; (4) medical subspecialties; (5) psychiatry; and (6) other. Frequent counseling was defined as having counseled patients who were known smokers at every visit or at least once a year. RESULTS: Overall, 45% of the physicians frequently counseled smokers to quit. Medical subspecialists (80%) were most likely and psychiatrists (29%) least likely to counsel frequently. Specialty, perceived relevance of counseling to the physician's practice, and self-confidence in counseling about smoking cessation were associated with frequent counseling. CONCLUSION: Cessation counseling by non-primary care physicians can reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. Increasing perceived relevance and self-confidence among this group of physicians, combined with implementation of system changes and the creation of physician accountability can facilitate the provision of such counseling. SN - 0363-0242 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11785855/Non_primary_care_physicians_and_smoking_cessation_counseling:_Women_Physicians'_Health_Study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1300/J013v34n04_02 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -