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CO2 and the end-Triassic mass extinction.
Nature. 2002 Jan 24; 415(6870):386-7; author reply 388.Nat

Abstract

The end of the Triassic period was marked by one of the largest and most enigmatic mass-extinction events in Earth's history and, with few reliable marine geochemical records, terrestrial sediments offer an important means of deciphering environmental changes at this time. Tanner et al. describe an isotopic study of Mesozoic fossil soils which suggests that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (pCO2) across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary was relatively constant (within 250 p.p.m.v.), but this is inconsistent with high-resolution evidence from the stomatal characters of fossil leaves. Here I show that the temporal resolution of the fossil-soil samples may have been inadequate for detecting a transient rise in pCO2. I also show that the fossil-soil data are consistent with a large increase in pCO2 across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary when variations in the stable carbon isotope (denoted as delta13C) in terrestrial plant leaves are taken into account. These factors suggest that the linkage between pCO2, global warming and the end-Triassic mass extinction remains intact.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Letter
Comment

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11807542

Citation

Beerling, David. "CO2 and the end-Triassic Mass Extinction." Nature, vol. 415, no. 6870, 2002, pp. 386-7; author reply 388.
Beerling D. CO2 and the end-Triassic mass extinction. Nature. 2002;415(6870):386-7; author reply 388.
Beerling, D. (2002). CO2 and the end-Triassic mass extinction. Nature, 415(6870), 386-7; author reply 388.
Beerling D. CO2 and the end-Triassic Mass Extinction. Nature. 2002 Jan 24;415(6870):386-7; author reply 388. PubMed PMID: 11807542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CO2 and the end-Triassic mass extinction. A1 - Beerling,David, PY - 2002/1/25/pubmed PY - 2002/3/16/medline PY - 2002/1/25/entrez SP - 386-7; author reply 388 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 415 IS - 6870 N2 - The end of the Triassic period was marked by one of the largest and most enigmatic mass-extinction events in Earth's history and, with few reliable marine geochemical records, terrestrial sediments offer an important means of deciphering environmental changes at this time. Tanner et al. describe an isotopic study of Mesozoic fossil soils which suggests that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (pCO2) across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary was relatively constant (within 250 p.p.m.v.), but this is inconsistent with high-resolution evidence from the stomatal characters of fossil leaves. Here I show that the temporal resolution of the fossil-soil samples may have been inadequate for detecting a transient rise in pCO2. I also show that the fossil-soil data are consistent with a large increase in pCO2 across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary when variations in the stable carbon isotope (denoted as delta13C) in terrestrial plant leaves are taken into account. These factors suggest that the linkage between pCO2, global warming and the end-Triassic mass extinction remains intact. SN - 0028-0836 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11807542/CO2_and_the_end_Triassic_mass_extinction_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/415386a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -