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Anesthesia for patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis: a questionnaire study in Japan.
Anesth Analg 2002; 94(2):271-4, table of contentsA&A

Abstract

We investigated the anesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA) in Japan. CIPA is a rare inherited disease characterized by a lack of pain sensation and thermoregulation. Although lacking pain sensation, some patients do have tactile hyperesthesia. Thus, anesthetics are a necessity during operations. We also determined that because patients with CIPA have problems with thermoregulation, temperature management is a concern during the perioperative period and sufficient sedation is necessary to avoid accidental fractures. Additionally, it was found that the use of muscle relaxants does not present a problem, malignant hyperthermia is not associated with CIPA, and that the possibility of abnormalities in the autonomic nervous system must be taken into consideration. Therefore, patients with CIPA can be safely managed with anesthesia.

IMPLICATIONS

We investigated the anesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis. We clarified the following three important points: anesthesia is necessary, temperature management must be maintained, and there must be sufficient perioperative sedation in the anesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Japan. tomiokat-ane@h.u-tokyo.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11812683

Citation

Tomioka, Toshiya, et al. "Anesthesia for Patients With Congenital Insensitivity to Pain and Anhidrosis: a Questionnaire Study in Japan." Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 94, no. 2, 2002, 271-4, table of contents.
Tomioka T, Awaya Y, Nihei K, et al. Anesthesia for patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis: a questionnaire study in Japan. Anesth Analg. 2002;94(2):271-4, table of contents.
Tomioka, T., Awaya, Y., Nihei, K., Sekiyama, H., Sawamura, S., & Hanaoka, K. (2002). Anesthesia for patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis: a questionnaire study in Japan. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 94(2), 271-4, table of contents.
Tomioka T, et al. Anesthesia for Patients With Congenital Insensitivity to Pain and Anhidrosis: a Questionnaire Study in Japan. Anesth Analg. 2002;94(2):271-4, table of contents. PubMed PMID: 11812683.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anesthesia for patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis: a questionnaire study in Japan. AU - Tomioka,Toshiya, AU - Awaya,Yutaka, AU - Nihei,Kenji, AU - Sekiyama,Hiroshi, AU - Sawamura,Shigehito, AU - Hanaoka,Kazuo, PY - 2002/1/29/pubmed PY - 2002/3/30/medline PY - 2002/1/29/entrez SP - 271-4, table of contents JF - Anesthesia and analgesia JO - Anesth. Analg. VL - 94 IS - 2 N2 - UNLABELLED: We investigated the anesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA) in Japan. CIPA is a rare inherited disease characterized by a lack of pain sensation and thermoregulation. Although lacking pain sensation, some patients do have tactile hyperesthesia. Thus, anesthetics are a necessity during operations. We also determined that because patients with CIPA have problems with thermoregulation, temperature management is a concern during the perioperative period and sufficient sedation is necessary to avoid accidental fractures. Additionally, it was found that the use of muscle relaxants does not present a problem, malignant hyperthermia is not associated with CIPA, and that the possibility of abnormalities in the autonomic nervous system must be taken into consideration. Therefore, patients with CIPA can be safely managed with anesthesia. IMPLICATIONS: We investigated the anesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis. We clarified the following three important points: anesthesia is necessary, temperature management must be maintained, and there must be sufficient perioperative sedation in the anesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis. SN - 0003-2999 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11812683/Anesthesia_for_patients_with_congenital_insensitivity_to_pain_and_anhidrosis:_a_questionnaire_study_in_Japan_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00000539-200202000-00008 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -