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Influenza vaccination among minority populations in the United States.
Prev Med. 2002 Feb; 34(2):235-41.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A large portion of the elderly population of the United States fails to receive an annual influenza vaccination. Minorities may receive disproportionately fewer vaccinations. The objectives of this study were to (a) estimate the levels of influenza vaccination among noninstitutionalized, U.S. citizens, 65 years and older, (b) examine the immunization levels among minority racial and ethnic groups relative to various majority groupings, and (c) explore potential factors that may contribute to disparities in vaccination levels.

METHODS

We analyzed data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to compare influenza vaccination levels of different racial and ethnic groups among 2,309 persons aged 65 years and older.

RESULTS

Whites had 68.0% (+/- SE 1.5%) current influenza vaccination, Hispanics 61.7% (+/- SE 4.1%), and blacks 47.3% (+/- SE 4.3%). Blacks differed significantly compared to whites. Adjustment for potential confounders such as increased health risk, age distribution, perceived health status, family size, poverty level, and the number of ambulatory visits to a health care provider failed to change this difference substantially.

CONCLUSIONS

In 1996, among elderly noninstitutionalized, U.S. citizens, blacks relative to whites were less likely to have current influenza vaccinations. This relationship remained significant even after adjustments for potential confounding variables.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry, University Hospital I-354, 150 Bergen Street, Newark, New Jersey 07103, USA. marinma@umdnj.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11817920

Citation

Marin, Matthew G., et al. "Influenza Vaccination Among Minority Populations in the United States." Preventive Medicine, vol. 34, no. 2, 2002, pp. 235-41.
Marin MG, Johanson WG, Salas-Lopez D. Influenza vaccination among minority populations in the United States. Prev Med. 2002;34(2):235-41.
Marin, M. G., Johanson, W. G., & Salas-Lopez, D. (2002). Influenza vaccination among minority populations in the United States. Preventive Medicine, 34(2), 235-41.
Marin MG, Johanson WG, Salas-Lopez D. Influenza Vaccination Among Minority Populations in the United States. Prev Med. 2002;34(2):235-41. PubMed PMID: 11817920.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influenza vaccination among minority populations in the United States. AU - Marin,Matthew G, AU - Johanson,Waldemar G,Jr AU - Salas-Lopez,Debbie, PY - 2002/1/31/pubmed PY - 2002/3/5/medline PY - 2002/1/31/entrez SP - 235 EP - 41 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 34 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: A large portion of the elderly population of the United States fails to receive an annual influenza vaccination. Minorities may receive disproportionately fewer vaccinations. The objectives of this study were to (a) estimate the levels of influenza vaccination among noninstitutionalized, U.S. citizens, 65 years and older, (b) examine the immunization levels among minority racial and ethnic groups relative to various majority groupings, and (c) explore potential factors that may contribute to disparities in vaccination levels. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to compare influenza vaccination levels of different racial and ethnic groups among 2,309 persons aged 65 years and older. RESULTS: Whites had 68.0% (+/- SE 1.5%) current influenza vaccination, Hispanics 61.7% (+/- SE 4.1%), and blacks 47.3% (+/- SE 4.3%). Blacks differed significantly compared to whites. Adjustment for potential confounders such as increased health risk, age distribution, perceived health status, family size, poverty level, and the number of ambulatory visits to a health care provider failed to change this difference substantially. CONCLUSIONS: In 1996, among elderly noninstitutionalized, U.S. citizens, blacks relative to whites were less likely to have current influenza vaccinations. This relationship remained significant even after adjustments for potential confounding variables. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11817920/Influenza_vaccination_among_minority_populations_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091743501909831 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -