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Risk of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in postmenopausal women supplemented with calcium or combined calcium and estrogen.
Maturitas 2002; 41(2):149-56M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent studies showed that postmenopausal women lost less bone mass when supplemented with calcium or estrogen therapy. However, the safety of the treatments in terms of the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation is unknown. We therefore conducted this study to determine the alteration in calcium oxalate supersaturation after calcium supplement or after combined calcium and estrogen therapy in postmenopausal osteoporotic women.

METHODS

Fifty-six postmenopausal women were enrolled in this study. All subjects were more than 10 years postmenopausal with vertebral or femoral osteoporosis by bone mineral density criteria. They were randomly allocated to receive either 625 mg of calcium carbonate (250 mg of elemental calcium) at the end of a meal three times a day (group A, n=26) or calcium carbonate in the same manner plus 0.625 mg/day of conjugated equine estrogen and 5 mg medrogestone acetate from day 1-12 each month (group B, n=30). The age (mean +/- S.E.M.) was 66.3 +/- 1.2 and 65.1 +/- 1.1 years, weight 54.1 +/- 1.2 and 55.3 +/- 2.1 kg, in group A and group B, respectively. Urine specimens (24-h) were collected at baseline and 3 months after treatment for the determination of calcium oxalate saturation by using Tiselius's index (AP(CaOx)) and calcium/citrate ratio.

RESULTS

After 3 months of treatment, there was no significant alteration from baseline for urinary excretion of calcium, citrate and oxalate. Urinary phosphate excretion was significantly reduced (6.3 +/- 0.7 vs. 5.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/day for group A and 8.2 +/- 0.9 vs. 5.8 +/- 0.7 mmol/day for group B, P<0.05), whereas net alkaline absorption was significantly elevated (10.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 20.1 +/- 4.4 meq/day for group A and 4.8 +/- 3.2 vs. 19.9 +/- 3.6 meq/day for group B, P<0.05). Calcium/citrate ratio and AP(CaOx) determined at baseline were not different from the corresponding values after treatment in both groups; calcium/citrate: 10.1 +/- 3.1 vs. 10.1 +/- 2.5 for group A and 9.3 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.9 +/- 2.5 for group B and AP(CaOx): 1.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.2 for group A and 1.2 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.1 for group B. There were eight and nine patients with high AP(CaOx), or >2, at baseline and after treatment, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Calcium supplement with a meal or combined calcium supplement and estrogen therapy is not associated with a significant increased risk of calcium oxalate stone formation in the majority of postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. Determination of urinary saturation for calcium oxalate after calcium and estrogen supplements, especially at the initial phase of treatment, may be helpful in the avoidance of nephrolithiasis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Rama 6, Bangkok 10400, Thailand. rasdr@mahidol.ac.thNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11836046

Citation

Domrongkitchaiporn, Somnuek, et al. "Risk of Calcium Oxalate Nephrolithiasis in Postmenopausal Women Supplemented With Calcium or Combined Calcium and Estrogen." Maturitas, vol. 41, no. 2, 2002, pp. 149-56.
Domrongkitchaiporn S, Ongphiphadhanakul B, Stitchantrakul W, et al. Risk of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in postmenopausal women supplemented with calcium or combined calcium and estrogen. Maturitas. 2002;41(2):149-56.
Domrongkitchaiporn, S., Ongphiphadhanakul, B., Stitchantrakul, W., Chansirikarn, S., Puavilai, G., & Rajatanavin, R. (2002). Risk of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in postmenopausal women supplemented with calcium or combined calcium and estrogen. Maturitas, 41(2), pp. 149-56.
Domrongkitchaiporn S, et al. Risk of Calcium Oxalate Nephrolithiasis in Postmenopausal Women Supplemented With Calcium or Combined Calcium and Estrogen. Maturitas. 2002 Feb 26;41(2):149-56. PubMed PMID: 11836046.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in postmenopausal women supplemented with calcium or combined calcium and estrogen. AU - Domrongkitchaiporn,Somnuek, AU - Ongphiphadhanakul,Boonsong, AU - Stitchantrakul,Wasana, AU - Chansirikarn,Sirinthorn, AU - Puavilai,Gobchai, AU - Rajatanavin,Rajata, PY - 2002/2/12/pubmed PY - 2002/4/20/medline PY - 2002/2/12/entrez SP - 149 EP - 56 JF - Maturitas JO - Maturitas VL - 41 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent studies showed that postmenopausal women lost less bone mass when supplemented with calcium or estrogen therapy. However, the safety of the treatments in terms of the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation is unknown. We therefore conducted this study to determine the alteration in calcium oxalate supersaturation after calcium supplement or after combined calcium and estrogen therapy in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. METHODS: Fifty-six postmenopausal women were enrolled in this study. All subjects were more than 10 years postmenopausal with vertebral or femoral osteoporosis by bone mineral density criteria. They were randomly allocated to receive either 625 mg of calcium carbonate (250 mg of elemental calcium) at the end of a meal three times a day (group A, n=26) or calcium carbonate in the same manner plus 0.625 mg/day of conjugated equine estrogen and 5 mg medrogestone acetate from day 1-12 each month (group B, n=30). The age (mean +/- S.E.M.) was 66.3 +/- 1.2 and 65.1 +/- 1.1 years, weight 54.1 +/- 1.2 and 55.3 +/- 2.1 kg, in group A and group B, respectively. Urine specimens (24-h) were collected at baseline and 3 months after treatment for the determination of calcium oxalate saturation by using Tiselius's index (AP(CaOx)) and calcium/citrate ratio. RESULTS: After 3 months of treatment, there was no significant alteration from baseline for urinary excretion of calcium, citrate and oxalate. Urinary phosphate excretion was significantly reduced (6.3 +/- 0.7 vs. 5.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/day for group A and 8.2 +/- 0.9 vs. 5.8 +/- 0.7 mmol/day for group B, P<0.05), whereas net alkaline absorption was significantly elevated (10.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 20.1 +/- 4.4 meq/day for group A and 4.8 +/- 3.2 vs. 19.9 +/- 3.6 meq/day for group B, P<0.05). Calcium/citrate ratio and AP(CaOx) determined at baseline were not different from the corresponding values after treatment in both groups; calcium/citrate: 10.1 +/- 3.1 vs. 10.1 +/- 2.5 for group A and 9.3 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.9 +/- 2.5 for group B and AP(CaOx): 1.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.2 for group A and 1.2 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.1 for group B. There were eight and nine patients with high AP(CaOx), or >2, at baseline and after treatment, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Calcium supplement with a meal or combined calcium supplement and estrogen therapy is not associated with a significant increased risk of calcium oxalate stone formation in the majority of postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. Determination of urinary saturation for calcium oxalate after calcium and estrogen supplements, especially at the initial phase of treatment, may be helpful in the avoidance of nephrolithiasis. SN - 0378-5122 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11836046/Risk_of_calcium_oxalate_nephrolithiasis_in_postmenopausal_women_supplemented_with_calcium_or_combined_calcium_and_estrogen_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378512201002778 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -