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"Healthy-start": outcome of an intervention to promote a heart healthy diet in preschool children.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We evaluated the effects of a preschool nutrition education and food service intervention "Healthy Start," on two-to-five-year-old children in nine Head Start Centers in upstate NY. The primary objective was to reduce the saturated fat (sat-fat) content of preschool meals to <10% daily energy (E) and to reduce consumption of sat-fat by preschoolers to <10% E.

METHODS

Six centers were assigned to the food service intervention and three to control condition. Food service intervention included training workshops for cooks and monthly site visits to review progress towards goals. Child dietary intake at preschool was assessed by direct observation and plate waste measurement. Dietary intake at home was assessed by parental food record and telephone interviews. Dietary data were collected each Fall/Spring over two years, including five days of menus and recipes from each center. Dietary data were analyzed with the Minnesota NDS software.

RESULTS

Consumption of saturated fat from school meals decreased significantly from 1.0%E to 10.4%E after one year of intervention and to 8.0%E after the second year, compared with an increase of 10.2% to 13.0% to 11.4%E, respectively, for control schools (p < 0.001). Total caloric intake was adequately maintained for both groups. Analysis of preschool menus and recipes over the two-year period of intervention showed a significant decrease in sat-fat content in intervention preschools (from 12.5 at baseline to 8.0%E compared with a change of 12.1%E to >11.6%E in control preschools (p < 0.001)). Total fat content of menus also decreased significantly in intervention schools (31.0% to >25.0%E) compared with controls (29.9% to >28.4%E).

CONCLUSIONS

The Healthy Start food service intervention was effective in reducing the fat and saturated fat content of preschool meals and reducing children's consumption of saturated fat at preschool without compromising energy intake or intake of essential nutrients. These goals are consistent with current U.S Dietary Guidelines for children older than two years of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Children's Cardiovascular Health Center, Columbia University, Institute of Human Nutrition and Department of Pediatrics, Babies and Children's Hospital, New York, NY 10032, USA. chrisw@pol.net

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Source

MeSH

Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Diet Records
Dietary Fats
Female
Food Services
Health Policy
Health Promotion
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
United States

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11838889

Citation

Williams, Christine L., et al. ""Healthy-start": Outcome of an Intervention to Promote a Heart Healthy Diet in Preschool Children." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 1, 2002, pp. 62-71.
Williams CL, Bollella MC, Strobino BA, et al. "Healthy-start": outcome of an intervention to promote a heart healthy diet in preschool children. J Am Coll Nutr. 2002;21(1):62-71.
Williams, C. L., Bollella, M. C., Strobino, B. A., Spark, A., Nicklas, T. A., Tolosi, L. B., & Pittman, B. P. (2002). "Healthy-start": outcome of an intervention to promote a heart healthy diet in preschool children. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 21(1), pp. 62-71.
Williams CL, et al. "Healthy-start": Outcome of an Intervention to Promote a Heart Healthy Diet in Preschool Children. J Am Coll Nutr. 2002;21(1):62-71. PubMed PMID: 11838889.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - "Healthy-start": outcome of an intervention to promote a heart healthy diet in preschool children. AU - Williams,Christine L, AU - Bollella,Marguerite C, AU - Strobino,Barbara A, AU - Spark,Arlene, AU - Nicklas,Theresa A, AU - Tolosi,Laura B, AU - Pittman,Brian P, PY - 2002/2/13/pubmed PY - 2002/9/27/medline PY - 2002/2/13/entrez SP - 62 EP - 71 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effects of a preschool nutrition education and food service intervention "Healthy Start," on two-to-five-year-old children in nine Head Start Centers in upstate NY. The primary objective was to reduce the saturated fat (sat-fat) content of preschool meals to <10% daily energy (E) and to reduce consumption of sat-fat by preschoolers to <10% E. METHODS: Six centers were assigned to the food service intervention and three to control condition. Food service intervention included training workshops for cooks and monthly site visits to review progress towards goals. Child dietary intake at preschool was assessed by direct observation and plate waste measurement. Dietary intake at home was assessed by parental food record and telephone interviews. Dietary data were collected each Fall/Spring over two years, including five days of menus and recipes from each center. Dietary data were analyzed with the Minnesota NDS software. RESULTS: Consumption of saturated fat from school meals decreased significantly from 1.0%E to 10.4%E after one year of intervention and to 8.0%E after the second year, compared with an increase of 10.2% to 13.0% to 11.4%E, respectively, for control schools (p < 0.001). Total caloric intake was adequately maintained for both groups. Analysis of preschool menus and recipes over the two-year period of intervention showed a significant decrease in sat-fat content in intervention preschools (from 12.5 at baseline to 8.0%E compared with a change of 12.1%E to >11.6%E in control preschools (p < 0.001)). Total fat content of menus also decreased significantly in intervention schools (31.0% to >25.0%E) compared with controls (29.9% to >28.4%E). CONCLUSIONS: The Healthy Start food service intervention was effective in reducing the fat and saturated fat content of preschool meals and reducing children's consumption of saturated fat at preschool without compromising energy intake or intake of essential nutrients. These goals are consistent with current U.S Dietary Guidelines for children older than two years of age. SN - 0731-5724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11838889/"Healthy_start":_outcome_of_an_intervention_to_promote_a_heart_healthy_diet_in_preschool_children_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/childnutrition.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -